SEB Seville 2019

CELL BIOLOGY SESSIONS

The following Cell biology sessions will take place at SEB Seville 2019.

Cell, animal and plant biology

Cell and plant biology

Cell and animal biology

Cell biology


Cell, animal and plant biology

Functional micro- and nano-structures in biology


Date: 5 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Zoology, botany, biomechanics, surface science, engineering, biomimetics 

Organisers:
  • Vladimir Katanaev (University of Lausanne, Switzerland)
  • Stanislav Gorb (University of Kiel, Germany)
Speakers:
  • Silvia Vignolini (University of Cambridge, UK)
  • Uwe Erb (University of Toronto, Canada)
  • Bodo Wilts (University of Fribourg, Switzerland)
  • Di Zhang (Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China)

Various biological surfaces are known to be covered by elaborated micro- and nano-structures, serving a number of functions (e.g. anti-reflective, structural coloration, antifouling, pro- or anti-adhesive, etc.) and inspiring numerous industrial applications. The field of micro- and nano-structured biological surfaces and their applications in biomimetics exists for several decades. Yet recent years have witnessed a remarkable development in research in this field. Largely, this boost owes to the increasing interdisciplinary of approaches being applied to the study of structured bio-surfaces. Sciences as different as classical zoology and botany are inseminated with the advances in genetics and molecular biology; biologists collaborate more and more with nanotechnologists, materials scientists and engineers - all these contribute to the widening of the horizons of research on micro- and nano-structured biological surfaces, and to biomimetic and bioengineering applications of these surfaces in industry. The main goal of our session is to bring together scientists coming from distinct disciplines into this vibrant field of research. This session will ensure cross-inspiration among the different participants coming from different research fields and will boost innovation in research and eventual industrial developments.

Related sessions:

Host-microbiota interactions across animal and plant kingdoms


Dates: 2 & 3 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following: Microbial ecology, molecular, microbiology, genetic and physiology of multicellular organisms and computational biology.

Organisers:
  • Davide Bulgarelli (University of Dundee, UK)
  • Tim Mauchline (Rothamsted Research, UK)
  • Xavier Harrison (Zoological Society London, UK)
Speakers:
  • Julia Vorholt (ETH Zürich, Switzerland)
  • Caroline Gutjahr (Technische Universität München, Germany)
  • Matt Hutchings (UEA, UK)
  • Nicola Segata (University of Trento, Italy)
  • Amanda Bretman (University of Leeds, UK)
  • Maria Elena Martino (University of Padova, Italy)

In the last decade, advances in sequencing and computational approaches have enabled the study of microbial communities associated with eukaryotic organisms at an unprecedented depth. These studies reinforced the notion that microbial communities impact the growth, development and health of their hosts. A prediction of this observation is that translational applications of host-microbiota interactions can impact life on earth for aspects as diverse as sustainable agricultural production and personalised medicine. Given the enormous potential for impact, this research field has been boosted in terms of research efforts globally. Novel methodological approaches and new resources are now available to facilitate next generation discoveries. This session aims at capitalising on these research efforts to highlight emerging trends and foster new, interdisciplinary, research collaborations.

Relevant sessions:

CELL AND PLANT BIOLOGY

Tip growth in plant biology


Dates: 4 & 5 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Life science, engineering, computer science and mathematical backgrounds with interest in the development of root hairs, pollen tubes, moss protonemata and fungal hyphae.

Organisers:
  • Kris Vissenberg (University of Antwerp, Belgium)
  • José Feijó (University of Maryland, USA)
Speakers:
  • Liam Dolan (University of Oxford, UK) - Emergence and evolution of tip growth in land plants
  • Zenbiao Yang (University of California Riverside, USA) - Mechanisms overarching apical, guided and invasive growth
  • Stefan Kepinski (University of Leeds, UK) 
  • José Feijo (University of Maryland, UK) - Ion homeostasis and the control of apical growth: molecular basis and integrative mechanisms
  • Aurelien Boisson-Dernier (University of Cologne, Germany) - Cell wall integrity sensing mechanisms in tip-growing cells
  • Magdalena Bezanilla (Dartmouth College, USA) - Steering tip growth: a cytoskeletal perspective
  • Armin Haupt (Institut Jacques Monod, France) - Growth promotes polarity through a positive feedback

Tip growth is a process that diverse walled cells such as pollen tubes, root hairs, moss protonemata and fungal hyphae have in common. Due to the diversity of the experimental systems, it is unusual for those working on the phenomenon to have the opportunity to get together and compare systems and concepts.

The aim of this session is to provide an overview on recent advances in the molecular, physiological and genetic mechanisms underlying tip growth, but other aspects of cell polarity establishment and maintenance as well as trafficking, cytoskeleton remodelling, signaling and biophysics will be covered, in an attempt to promote and facilitate interactions between experimental researchers and modelers from life science, engineering, computer science and mathematical backgrounds.

Related sessions:

Plant epigenetics


Date: 2 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following: Epigenetics, molecular biology, DNA stability, genetics, evolution, adaptation, plant responses to environmental changes (biotic and abiotic stresses), plant physiology, plant development       

Organisers:
  • Ana López Sánchez (CSIC, Spain)
  • Germán Martínez (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden)
Speakers:
  • Germán Martínez (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden) -  Epigenetic reprogramming during plant sexual reproduction
  • David Baulcombe (University of Cambridge, UK) - Establishment and maintenance of epigenetic marks in the tomato genome
  • Hailing Jin (University of California Riverside, USA) - Cross-Kingdom RNAi and small RNA trafficking between plant and fungal pathogens
  • Daniel Zilberman (John Innes Centre, UK) - Stable epigenetic inheritance of DNA methylation through pathway integration
  • Teresa Roldan (University of Cordoba, Spain) - Base excision repair: from genome repair to epigenome regulation
  • Isabel Baürle (University of Potsdam, Germany) - Adaptation to environmental stress by a chromatin-based stress memory

Epigenetics is a novel concept conceived as the study of inheritable phenotypic differences in the absence of changes to the DNA sequence. The discovery of epigenetics caused a paradigm shift in genetics, having important consequences for a broad spectrum of disciplines, from cancer research to psychology. Epigenetic mechanisms were first discovered in plants, and since then, they have been demonstrated to play an important role in a widespread variety of biological processes, including: plant response to environmental changes, cell fate determination, chromosome organization, DNA recombination and repair, silencing of transposable elements (TEs) to control genome stability, and evolution. Additionally, epigenetics has emerged as a powerful biotechnological tool for agricultural interests, as it facilitates the stable manipulation of gene expression avoiding transgenesis. Moreover, the use of our current knowledge in epigenetics allows us to detect and induce new variants, having the potential to yield innovative and perhaps more sustainable agricultural strategies. With this in mind, our goal is to bring together world leaders, early career researchers and students in the field of epigenetics. This session aims to promote their interaction in the most conducive and encouraging environment, addressing many different aspects of epigenetics, from mechanisms to biological roles.   

Relevant sessions:

General cell and plant biology (poster session only)


The general Cell and Plant biology session invites posters on all the aspects of plant and cell biology that are not catered for in the specific section sessions. As such, the session is an important element of the scientific programme, with high-quality presentations on a wide spectrum of subjects. 


CELL AND ANIMAL BIOLOGY

SENSING THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT


Date: 5 July 2019

WHO SHOULD SUBMIT:

Researchers with interest in the following: Neurobiology, sensory physiology, behaviour biomechanics, cell biology.

ORGANISERS:
  • Cosima Porteus (University of Exeter, UK)
  • Peter Hubbard (Centro de Ciências do Mar, Portugal)
Speakers:
  • John Lewis (University of Ottawa, Canada) - Dynamics of electric sensing
  • Anna Stöckl (Würzburg University, Germany) - Spatial processing in hawkmoth vision
  • Douglas Altshuler (University of British Columbia, Canada) - Encoding of optic flow in avian midbrain-cerebellar pathways for flight control
  • Danuta Wisniewska (Chizé Centre for Biological Studies, France) - The challenges and mechanisms of biosonar-mediated prey tracking in toothed whales

How do the functional properties of cells allow the detection of physical and chemical properties of their environment? These properties - light, pressure (atmospheric/hydrostatic and acoustic), magnetic field, temperature, pH and inorganic constituents - are used by organisms (bacteria, yeast, plants and animals) in a variety of ways; obtaining nutrients, navigation, homing, migration to name but a few. The aim of this session is to explore, firstly, how organisms detect the physical properties of their immediate environment and, secondly, what use they make of this information. Finally, the possible impact of human activity on these systems will be explored.

Related sessions:

SAVING ENERGY IN A FLUCTUATING ENVIRONMENT: FROM THE WHOLE ORGANISM DOWN TO THE MOLECULE

Supported by: Conservation physiologyLoligo Systems
Date: 3 July 2019

WHO SHOULD SUBMIT:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Ecophysiology, climate change, energetics, biological rhythm

ORGANISERS:
  • Loic Teulier (Claude Bernard University Lyon, France)
  • Caroline Gilbert (National School of Veterinary Medicine, France)
  • Sylvain Giroud (University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Austria)
Speakers:
  • Annika Herwig (Ulm University, Germany)
  • Fabrice Bertile (University of Strasbourg, France)
  • Jean-Michel Weber (University of Ottawa, Canada) - Metabolic suppression mechanisms 
  • Julia Nowack (Liverpool John Moores University, UK)

Over the course of evolution, organisms have adapted to environmental variability, notably through an optimisation of the mechanisms regulating energy balance involving morphological, behavioural, physiological, cellular and molecular adaptations. Energy conservation allows organisms to optimise their allocation to fitness components, i.e. survival, reproduction and growth, according to environmental conditions. The session will deal with  how animals are able to conserve energy in response to environmental limitations, such as food or water shortage, cold temperatures, droughts. In particular, we will develop the topic of physiological and behavioral strategies for energy savings from the whole organisms down to the cellular and molecular pathways. During this session, one of the main emphasis will be put on the strategy of hypometabolism as a mean to cope with fluctuating environments. Also, the use of different techniques and methods to assess energy expenditure, at both the whole-body and cellular levels, and body composition will be exposed. The talks will deal with the adaptive responses of animals from a variety of mammal, bird and fish species.

RELATED SESSIONS:

BRAIN BUILDING: PLASTICITY IN FORM AND FUNCTION OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM

Sponsored by: American Association of Anatomists

Date: 4 July 2019

WHO SHOULD SUBMIT:

Researchers with interest in the following: Neurobiology, neuroplasticity, environmental plasticity, behaviour, tissue remodelling, environmental physiology, stress physiology, endocrinology

ORGANISERS:
  • Sarah Alderman (University of Guelph, Canada)
  • Matthew Vickaryous (University of Guelph, Canada)
Speakers:
  • Gunther Zupanc (Northeastern University, USA) - Building and Rebuilding the Adult Central Nervous System of Teleost Fish: Mechanisms of Adult Neurogenesis and Neuronal Regeneration
  • Lara LaDage (Penn State Altoona, USA) - Environmental factors that modulate the neural phenotype in lizards
  • Sacri Ferron (University of Valencia, Spain) - Genomic imprinting and regulation of adult neurogenesis
  • Øyvind Øverli (Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway)

Adult neurogenesis – the ability to generate new neurons during postnatal ontogeny – is a taxonomically widespread but poorly understood phenomenon. Comparative models hold enormous promise for understanding the fundamental roles of neurogenesis in vertebrate brain evolution, neuroadaptation in response to environmental stimuli, and even therapeutic treatments for human medicine. This session will explore how and why brain (re)building occurs from multiple perspectives, including molecular and cellular mechanisms through to system and organismal consequences. Topics will include: (i) characterisation and maintenance of neural progenitor cells (ii) organisation and comparative anatomy of proliferation zones, (iii) physiological and environmental regulation of neurogenesis, and (iv) and translational applications.

RELATED SESSIONS:

FUELING THE FIRE OF LIFE – EVOLUTIONARY PHYSIOLOGY OF OXYGEN SUPPLY IN VERTEBRATES


Date: 3 July 2019

WHO SHOULD SUBMIT:

Researchers with interest in the following: Respiratory and cardiac biology, cell and molecular biology, ecophysiology, conservation physiology and comparative endocrinology.

ORGANISERS:
  • Jenni Prokkola (University of Liverpool, UK)
  • Michael Berenbrink (University of Liverpool, UK)
Speakers:
  • Sjannie Lefevre (University of Oslo, Norway) - Re-oxygenation resilience - the other aspect of the crucian carp's anoxia tolerance
  • Graham Scott (McMaster University, Canada) - Evolutionary physiology of aerobic performance and mitochondrial function in high-altitude natives
  • Kevin Campbell (University of Manitoba, Canada) - Employing comparative phylogenomic approaches to reveal adaptive evolutionary specializations in hemoglobin and myoglobin function
  • Lorna Moore (University of Colorado Denver, USA) - Measuring human high-altitude adaptation

The oxygen supply chain presents a major determinant of performance in vertebrates. The key players in the cascade are well known, and have been shown in some cases to be adapted to oxygen limited environments, including high altitude and hypoxic lakes, in different taxa. With improved genome scanning and transcriptomic techniques in addition to gene editing, adaptations in the system in various conditions can be studied with increasing speed. While adaptation through genetic changes can occur in the key proteins of oxygen supply, plasticity in the system as a whole can lead to limited responses to natural selection, which has not been widely addressed. This session is aimed to foster the sharing of most recent knowledge in both adaptation through natural selection and plasticity at all levels of the oxygen supply chain, for example, in oxygen-binding proteins, endocrine effects on red blood cells, and cardiac and mitochondrial capacity. We invite abstracts for oral and poster presentations covering the topic from the genome to the cellular and organismal levels in any vertebrate species, from terrestrial to aerial and aquatic environments, particularly those taking an evolutionary perspective.        

RELATED SESSIONS:

From genes to behaviour: acclimation mechanisms with potential use as biomarkers in disturbed coastal habitats


Date: 5 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Animal adaptation, animal bioenergetics, cell biology, conservation physiology, ecotoxicology.

Organisers:
  • Georgina Rivera-Ingraham (University of Seville, Spain)
  • Jehan-Hervé Lignot (University of Montpellier, France)
  • Rosa Freitas (University of Aveiro, Portugal)
  • Montserrat Solé (Spanish National Research Council, Spain)
  • Dimitri Theuerkauff (University of Montpellier, France)
Speakers:
  • Karine Salin (IFREMER, France)
  • Dietmar Kültz (University of California Davis, USA)
  • Carolina Freire (Federal University of Paraná, Brazil)
  • Gillian Renshaw (Griffith University, Australia)

This session will focus on the ecophysiology of coastal (interface) organisms and their strategies to cope with (biological or physico-chemical) changes in their environment. These habitats do not only suffer from large changes in salinity, temperature or oxygenation, but often receive high doses of pollutants derived from land use. Furthermore, the introduction of exotic species is causing an additional stress to native species. Traditional ecological monitoring has largely been used to assess ecosystem changes, but often requires large economic and time investments to develop long temporal data series.  Thus, the aim of this session is to bring researchers working on different cellular and sub-cellular strategies (from gene expression, the activation of antioxidants to pathways of detoxification) leading to increased tolerance to environmental changes in coastal organisms. Being often energy-demanding processes, an important focus will be given to bioenergetics of these adaptations. The final objective will be to debate on which of these markers may allow us to better predict, in each context, the fate of certain species and foresee possible changes in ecosystem composition. Ultimately, we aim to provide a complete perspective on the possibilities that ecophysiological biomarkers may have to contribute to conservation management and policy advise.

Related sessions:

CELL BIOLOGY

Computation in biological systems


Date: 2 July 2019

WHO SHOULD SUBMIT:

Researchers with interest in the following: Exploration of information processing across diverse biological systems (prokaryotes, fungi, plants, animals) and scales (molecules, cells, organs, ecosystems).

ORGANISERS:
  • George Bassel (University of Birmingham, UK)
  • Iain Johnstone (University of Birmingham, UK)
Speakers:
  • Iain Couzin (Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Germany)
  • Richard Morris (John Innes Centre, UK)
  • Andrew Adamatzky (University of the West of England, Bristol, UK) - Computing and sensing with slime mould, plants and fungi
  • Silva Santos (The Francis Crick Institute, UK)

Life depends as much on the flow of information as it does on the flow of energy. This session will explore how information from the environment is processed across scales in diverse biological systems. Our knowledge of how this occurs at a molecular level through gene regulatory networks is expanding. However, information processing also occurs at additional scales including epigenetic, sub-cellular, cellular, organ and ecosystems, where it is less well understood. Information processing is ubiquitous and essential across the tree of life, and is being studied by researchers in diverse fields ranging from prokaryotic to plant, animal and fungal systems. This session will bring together experimental and theoretical researchers from these currently disconnected communities in an effort to consolidate this emerging area of research. Key questions to be collectively addressed by the session will include: What is the nature of information? What is information processing? How do biological systems read and write information? By bringing together researchers working in different biological systems and scales, these themes will be explored and consolidated through a cohesive and multidisciplinary scientific program.