HumaNature

Speakers

Anders Hedenström

Anders Hedenstrom

Professor in Theoretical Ecology (Lund University, Sweden)

Prof Hedenström has studied animal flight and migration for more than 25 years, initially with a focus on birds but now also bats. He is interested in understanding flight and migration strategies in wild animals, but uses a wind tunnel facility for detailed studies of aerodynamic mechanisms. Anders read biology at Lund University and completed a PhD in 1995. Postdoctoral research at Cambridge University focused on bumble flight, and since 1996 he started his independent research as Assistant Professor, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences research fellows, and since 2004 Professor in theoretical ecology. He has collaborated with several scientists to develop new techniques for measuring aerodynamic performance in the wind tunnel and flight behaviour in free-ranging birds. He participated in three ice-breaker expeditions to the Arctic, where tracking radars were used to study flight routes in migratory birds. At Lund University, he is a member of the Centre for Animal Movement Research, and head of the Animal Flight Lab. 


Andreas Fahlman

Andreas Fahlman

Comparative and Environmental Physiologist (Oceanografic Foundation)

Andreas Fahlman is a comparative physiologist whose research projects revolve around the central question of how animals function in challenging environments.He has devised and implemented remote data logging techniques to measure dive duration and depth, and to estimate the effects of pressure on lung function, gas exchange, metabolism, heart rate, temperature regulation, and foraging efficiency in freely-diving sea birds and marine mammals. Andreas was born and raised in Sweden, and moved to Hawaii in 1993 to pursue a BSc in Marine Biology. He completed his PhD in Biology from Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada in 2000, with an award-winning dissertation On the Physiology of Hydrogen Diving and its Implication for Hydrogen Biochemical Decompression, based on research he performed at the Naval Medical Research Center, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. His graduate and post-graduate studies ranged from ultra-deep diving physiology; novel methods for reducing the risk of decompression sickness; genetic regulation of respiratory and cardiovascular responses to diving and hypoxia in marine mammals and birds; and molecular and metabolic biochemistry in hibernating mammals.His research efforts have included laboratory and field studies in North and South America, Europe, and Africa, from Arctic to Antarctic regions. He is currently a Research Scientist at the Oceanografic Foundation in Valencia, Spain, where he studies cardiorespiratory adaptations in marine mammals.


Andreas Møllerløkken

Andreas Møllerløkken

Associate Professor (Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway)

Andreas Møllerløkken is an applied physiologist from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU, in Trondheim, Norway. His research career started as a MSc student with Professor Alf O. Brubakk, which introduced him into the world of barophysiology. Andreas has always been interested in physiological adaptation to extreme environments, with a special focus related to the different challenges humans are facing in the activity of diving. He completed his PhD in 2008 on the formation of vascular gas bubbles during and after decompression, and their subsequent potential adverse effects on the circulatory and cardiovascular system. Andreas has focused on an translational approach, using animal models to understand human physiology. He has arranged several international conferences within barophysiology, and is responsible for an applied physiology course focusing on adaptation to cold environments held at Svalbard. His research interests are also related to the hypobaric environment, and currently he is a senior advisor at the Institute of Aviation Medicine in the Norwegian Armed Forces Medical Services in addition to being an associate professor at NTNU in Trondheim.


 Andrew Jones

Andrew Jones

Professor of Applied Physiology (University of Exeter, UK)

Andrew Jones PhD is Professor of Applied Physiology at the University of Exeter, UK, where he was formerly Head of Sport and Health Sciences (2010-2015) and is presently Associate Dean for Research and Impact in the College of Life and Environmental Sciences. Prof Jones received his B.Sc. in Sports Science (First Class, 1991) and his Ph.D. in Exercise Physiology (1994) from the University of Brighton, after which he completed a postdoctoral research fellowship in respiratory physiology and medicine at the University of California in Los Angeles. Prof Jones was appointed as Senior Lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University (1997) and was promoted to Reader (2001) and Professor (2004) before joining the University of Exeter in 2005. Prof Jones is internationally recognized for his expertise in the following areas: 1) control of, and limitations to, human skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism; 2) causes of exercise intolerance in health and disease; 3) respiratory physiology, particularly the kinetics of pulmonary gas exchange and ventilation during exercise; and 4) sports performance physiology, particularly in relation to endurance athletics. The Jones lab combines non-invasive (pulmonary gas exchange, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, near infra-red spectrometry) and invasive (blood and skeletal muscle sampling) techniques to investigate the limitations to sustainable exercise across the spectrum of human conditions.


Beth Healey

Beth Healey

Research MD (European Space Agency at Concordia Station, Antarctica)

Beth, is a UK trained doctor who overwintered in Antarctica as research MD for the European Space Agency at spaceflight analogue Concordia ‘White Mars’. A fellow of the Royal Geographical Society with an interest in polar environments she has worked as part of logistical and medical support teams for ski mountaineering expeditions and endurance races in Svalbard, Greenland, Siberia and at the North Pole.

Concordia Station, Antarctica, is a spaceflight analogue, ‘White Mars’, in view of its isolation, inaccessibility, altitude, low light levels and skeleton crew. Beth has recently returned from a year-long mission there where she was working for the European Space Agency implementing research protocols to investigate the effects of this extreme environment on the physiology and psychology of the overwinter crew. They were also testing systems for sustainable extra-terrestrial habitats – for example, water recycling.


Carl Soulsbury

Carl Soulsbury

Evolutionary and Behavioural Ecologist (University of Lincoln, UK)

Dr Carl Soulsbury has been studying the behaviour and ecology of wild animals for fifteen years, and presently focuses on how organisms schedule their reproductive effort across their entire lives. This includes understanding the genetic and hormonal underpinning of such patterns. He has a particular interest in how patterns of exercise interact with different parts of the physiological system to reduce or speed up individual ageing. Carl read Zoology as an undergraduate at the University of Aberdeen and completed a PhD in Behavioural Ecology at the University of Bristol where he compares the costs and benefits of dispersal versus philopatry in urban red foxes. He later worked in Finland on his current main study species, the black grouse.  He currently runs research programmes in a number of study systems including plants and insects, as well as his continuing work on grouse. Since 2012, Carl has been an academic at the University of Lincoln, teaching courses on statistics, conservation and behavioural ecology. 


Charles Bishop

Charles Bishop

Senior Lecturer in Zoology (Bangor University, UK)

Charles Bishop is broadly interested in the ability of birds and mammals to undergo long distance movements and migrations, along with the physiology of the muscular, respiratory and cardiovascular systems that support such activity. His work has primarily focused on avian species, ranging from muscle biochemical studies in the laboratory, to modelling of comparative blood flow and effects of heart size, to field-based studies of pigeon flight and long-distance migration and energetics of waterfowl. His work began as a post-doc at Birmingham University and he is now based at the School of Biological Sciences, Bangor University, Wales. Questions of interest include the effects of added mass and drag on the flight energetics of birds and the impact of atmospheric variables on flight performance. His main approach is to use measures of heart rate and body accelerations to interpret the biology of animal locomotion. Research highlights include the observation that measures of heart mass can provide useful estimates of maximum aerobic performance, that aerobic scope increases with body mass with an exponent of around 1.05, and that measures of heart rate in geese suggest that the rate of oxygen consumption is approximately proportional to heart rate squared while being proportional to wingbeat frequency to the exponent of 7. 


Christina Eichstaedt

Christine Eichstaedt 

 

Molecular Biologist (Thoraxclinic, University Hospital Heidelberg; The Institute of Human Genetics, Heidelberg University, Germany)

Dr Christina A. Eichstaedt has a broad interest in human adaptation and disease. She focused on adaptation to high altitudes during her doctoral dissertation and continued to work in the field of reduced oxygen from a medical perspective. Now she is studying the influence of genetic variations on pulmonary arterial hypertension, a rare often inherited lung disease, which may also be induced by exposure to high altitude. After a Bachelor in Molecular Biotechnology at the Technical University of Dresden (Germany), Dr Christina Eichstaedt specialised in human genetics during a Master of Philosophy in Applied Biological Anthropology at the University of Cambridge (UK). For her PhD dissertation, she investigated the genetic and physiological adaptation to high altitude of indigenous Andean populations in Argentina and received her PhD degree in Biological Anthropology from the University of Cambridge (UK) in 2014. Until present, she is working as a Post-Doc at the Centre for Pulmonary Hypertension at the Thoraxclinic and the Institute for Human Genetics at the University Hospital Heidelberg to research genetics and epigenetics of pulmonary arterial hypertension.


Craig Franklin

Craig E. Franklin

Deputy Head, School of Biological Sciences & Professor in Zoology (The University of Queensland, Australia) and Vice President (Society for Experimental Biology)

Craig is currently Deputy Head of School and Professor in Zoology at The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. He is the Vice President for the Society for Experimental Biology (UK), the leading international society for the field of experimental animal physiology and is editor for Journal of Experimental Biology and the new journal, Conservation Physiology.   His research program focuses on how ectothermic vertebrates (fish, frogs and reptiles) can survive and function in extreme and changing environmental conditions.   Internationally he is regarded as one of the leading proponents of the emerging field of conservation physiology and has a number of research projects assessing the impact of human induced environmental change on animals.

Craig leads the Eco-Lab research group at UQ (www.uq.edu.au/eco-lab) and has ongoing collaborations with external agencies including Australia Zoo, NSW Fisheries, and Ridley Aquafeeds.  He is particularly interested in the flexibility and plasticity of physiological systems (including cardiorespiratory and musculoskeletal) to compensate for and maintain performance under changing environmental conditions.   His research combines lab-based experimental studies with field-based studies and he takes an integrative approach that utilises ecological, behavioural, physiological and genomic approaches.   In the field he utilises remote sensing technology (acoustic and satellite telemetry, archival tags) to investigate the physiology and behavior of animals under natural conditions. He has published over 240 scientific articles, including articles in Nature, Nature Climate Change, Proceedings of the Royal Society, Global Change Biology and a significant body of work in the leading journal in his field, Journal of Experimental Biology.


David Oxborough

David Oxborough

Reader in Cardiovascular Physiology (Liverpool John Moores University, UK)

David Oxborough is a Clinical Cardiac Sonographer and Reader in Cardiovascular Physiology at Liverpool John Moores University and the Heart and Chest Hospital, Liverpool. His clinical career began in 1996 in hospitals in the Yorkshire region before taking up a post as a lecturer at the University of Leeds in 2006 to manage the cardiac ultrasound postgraduate pathway. During that time, he completed his PhD which was focused on the impact of prolonged strenuous exercise on the heart using novel ultrasound techniques. He is an active member of the British Society of Echocardiography being lead author on professional guidelines for the use of echocardiography in the athlete whilst contributing to numerous others. He is also the Past-Chair of the Consortium for Accrediting Sonographic Education in the UK and acts as a lead accreditor for ultrasound education programmes nationwide.

As an academic and researcher, Dr Oxborough has published over 100 peer reviewed papers on echocardiography and its applications in Clinical and Exercise Cardiology. He has continuously worked in the imaging-based assessment of sudden cardiac death syndromes and pre-participation screening environment and has screened over 7000 athletes. He has continued to study the impact of endurance exercise on the heart and has travelled to endurance and ultra-endurance events across the globe to gain further insight into the acute cardiac effects of prolonged strenuous exercise and subsequent chronic adaptation. His work continues to explore this unique group of athletes aiming to answer the question as to whether too much exercise can be deleterious. 


Denny Levett

Denny Levett

Consultant in critical care and perioperative medicine (University Hospital Southampton NHS Trust, UK)

Denny is Consultant in Perioperative Medicine and Critical Care at Southampton University Hospital NHS Foundation trust and an Honorary Associate Professor at the University of Southampton. Denny has chaired the National Perioperative CPET course biannually since it was established in 2009 and is the chair for the newly formed national perioperative exercise testing and training society (POETTS, www.poetts.co.uk). Denny leads the CPET service at University Hospital Southampton NHS trust.

Denny was the Association of Anaesthetists Research Fellow and her PhD thesis, which evaluated exercise capacity and the efficiency of oxygen utilisation in hypoxia, involved the analysis of over 2000 CPET tests from the 2007 Caudwell Xtreme Everest Expedition. She was the Deputy Research Leader of the Caudwell Xtreme Everest expedition in 2007 and a member of the climbing team. They hold the world record for the highest ever performed incremental exercise test at 8000metres on Everest


Jo Corbett

Jo Corbett

Associate Head - Impact and Innovation (University of Portsmouth, UK)

Dr Jo Corbett is a Principal Lecturer in Exercise Physiology and an Associate Head of Department at the University of Portsmouth. Jo works in the Extreme Environments Laboratory (EEL), which investigates the physiological and psychological responses to adverse environments and the selection, preparation and protection of those who enter such environments. Jo’s recent research has focused on optimising the adaptation to heat, the use of combined and augmented stressors to aid adaptation to heat, and the ergogenic potential of heat acclimation. On a practical level, Jo has worked with athletes form many sports and has provided support and guidance on performing in the heat to athletes from recreational to World and Olympic Champion level.


Leigh Breen

Leigh Breen

Associate Professor of Musculoskeletal Physiology and Metabolism (University of Birmingham, UK)

Dr Leigh Breen is an Associate Professor of Musculoskeletal Physiology and Metabolism in the School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation at the University of Birmingham (UoB). His research activity is conducted, primarily under the auspices of the MRC-ARUK Centre for Musculoskeletal Ageing Research at UoB and centres on skeletal muscle metabolism. Specifically, Dr Breen’s research group are interested in understanding how ageing, disease and disuse influence the metabolic and molecular regulation of skeletal muscle protein turnover, and how exercise and/or nutrition can be applied to enhance skeletal muscle remodelling. Dr Breen has extensive training in the application of stable isotope tracer mass spectrometry and muscle biopsy techniques to study human muscle metabolism in vivo. Prior to his current role, Dr Breen completed a Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship at McMaster University, Canada, from 2011-2013 and a PhD at UoB from 2007-2010, under the guidance of leading experts in the field of exercise metabolism.


Lucy Hawkes

Lucy Hawkes

Senior Lecturer in Physiological Ecology (University of Exeter, UK)

Lucy is a physiological ecologist. Her research focuses on the costs and drivers of migratory strategies in vertebrate and invertebrate animals using emergent technologies such as satellite telemetry and physiological logging, as well as physiology techniques such as respirometry and blood gas analysis. Her work has also focused on the impact of external forcing factors, such as climate change and disease ecology, on migration and breeding ecology. Her future research will make inroads into migratory physiology of some of the most spectacular migratory performances using emerging technologies and multi-technique approaches.Lucy studied Marine Biology at Plymouth University before working in North Carolina, USA, for two years on a marine turtle conservation project. Lucy’s PhD used satellite tracking and oceanography remote sensing approaches to make some of the first insights into the migratory movements of populations of endangered marine turtles. In 2008, Lucy worked as a post doctoral researcher at Bangor University on the ecology and physiology of high-altitude migrations of bar-headed geese and has since developed this work to look into amazing migrations by birds, sharks, dragonflies and crabs. Lucy has been a lecturer at the University of Exeter since 2014 and teaches undergraduate ecology and physiology. She is a member of the Society for Experimental Biology and an Associate Editor at the journal Diversity and Distributions.


Mark Hannaford

Mark Hannaford
Founder of World Extreme Medicine; CEO of Society of Extreme, Expedition & Wilderness Medicine; Honorary Senior Lecturer (University of Exeter Medical School, UK)

Mark has a proven track record of creating change and an interest in the wider environment both a trained geographer and expedition leader but also as a medical innovator. Mark jointly conceived of the idea for HumaNature whilst working together with Professor Franklin in Antarctica and comparing the human experience of extreme cold and adaption in mammals.

Pioneer of programmes of social change, medical innovation, helped to raise £92m in charity fundraising. Change maker with over 30 years’ experience working in worldwide extreme environments. Founder of World Extreme Medicine, Across the Divide Expeditions & MSc in Extreme Medicine at the University of Exeter Medical School.


Matthew Edwards

Matthew Edwards
Extreme Medicine Medic (Kent Air Ambulance) and Doctor (Evelina London Children's Hospital, UK)

Dr Matthew Edwards is an Extreme Medicine medic and a doctor with Kent Air Ambulance and Evelina London Children's Hospital. He has also worked in Africa with AMREF Health Africa, where his missions took him to Rwanda, Burundi, Tanzania, Chad, Zanzibar, Madagascar, South Africa and all over Kenya.
Matt has spent a significant amount of time on the ice, through working as a medical officer for the British Antarctic Survey research facility on the Antarctic Peninsula of Roth era.
A keen educator, Matt has been involved in teaching and lecturing on behalf of WEM, and speaks regularly at the World Extreme Medicine Conference & London’s Air Ambulance, for whom he is an Education Fellow at the Institute of Pre-Hospital Care.


Michael Scantlebury

Michael Scantlebury

Lecturer (Queen's University Belfast, UK)

Michael Scantlebury is a physiological ecologist whose main areas of interest can be broadly grouped into: (1) Elucidation of environmental adaptation using measurements of daily energy expenditure, and resting metabolic rate (2), behavioural ecology, cooperative breeding and the evolution of breeding systems, (3) thermoregulatory adaptations to the environment, (4) interactions between energetics, life history strategies and costs of disease, (5) use of physiological techniques for implementing practical conservation. Michael read Zoology at Oxford and then undertook a PhD at Aberdeen, on the energetics of lactation in domestic dogs. He then had various postdoctoral positions based at Bristol (UK) working on badgers, cattle and bovine tuberculosis, Haifa (Israel) on rodent physiology and ecology, and Pretoria (South Africa) on the energetics, behaviour and ecology of various mammalian species (mole-rats, ground squirrels, cheetahs). He is currently based at Queen’s University Belfast where his laboratory is undertaking research into the behavior, disease, movement and conservation of a variety of species including domestic, agricultural and wild animals.


Steve Trangmar

Steve Trangmar

Lecturer in Cardiovascular & Exercise Physiology (University of Roehampton, UK)

Steve Trangmar's current research explores the circulatory limitations to exercise performance, with a particular focus on brain, systemic and active muscle blood flow and metabolism during exercise under conditions which tax the cardiovascular system to its regulatory limit.


Stuart Egginton

Eggington

Chair in Exercise Sciences (University of Leeds, UK)

Dr Stuart Egginton is a comparative / cardiovascular physiologist with interests that range from extreme physiological capacity in animals to exercise physiology in humans. His research spans the spectrum of molecular biology through behavioural ecology, attempting a more integrated understanding of physiological responses to various environmental and functional challenges. Of particular interest is how cardiac and skeletal muscle remodelling helps preserve the capacity for peripheral oxygen delivery and consumption. Stuart read Zoology at Bangor University, and obtained his PhD in Physiology at the University of St Andrews where he combined measurement of metabolic demand with morphometric analysis of skeletal muscle fine structure. Postdoctoral fellowships at the Universities of Maine and Birmingham concerned cardiorespiratory and locomotor muscle response to low temperature exposure, in fishes and mammals, combined with exploring consequences of muscle hypertrophy for microvascular development. He stayed in Birmingham for 28 years examining the mechanical transduction mechanisms underlying angiogenesis, while teaching a range of physiological topics to science and medical students, and starting an in vivo MRes programme. Stuart moved to Leeds in 2013 and continues angiogenesis research while developing animal models of exercise, and novel forms of training with human participants.


Zejlko Dujic

Dujic

Professor of physiology (University of Split School of Medicine, Croatia)

Dr Zeljko Dujic has been studying how human body responds to different stressors like exercise, immersion, breathing different gas mixtures (SCUBA diving or exposure to hypoxia and hypercapnia), holding breath for long time, etc. Integrative in vivo whole body responses are the main interest for the whole group. Elite breath hold divers are used as a model of extreme physiological responses in different aspects such as sympathexcitation, brain adaptation to extreme hypoxia, compression of the heart and blood vessels during pulmonary hyperinflation, exposure to extreme chemostress, etc. In addition to work with healthy subjects, he has started to work with heart failure, chronic opstructive lung disease, stroke and recently spinal cord injury patients. Dr Dujic completed MD programme in Zagreb, Croatia in 1983 and PhD programme in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA in 1986. He is a head of the Department of Integrative Physiology since 2007 at the University of Split School of Medicine. He has been teaching physiology courses to medical, dental, pharmacy students as well as different health sciences (nursing, radiographers, etc). He is head of PhD programme Evidence-Based medicine since 2009. He has published over 150 papers in peer-reviewed journals and has mentored 15 PhD students.

Humanature symposium - web

HumaNature

Natural History Museum, UK
11 - 12 November 2017
SEB Florence 2018 - web icon

SEB Florence 2018

Florence, Italy
3 - 6 July 2018
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