SEB Florence 2018 - Programme

CELL BIOLOGY SESSIONS

The following Cell Biology sessions will take place at SEB Florence 2018.

Cell and Animal Biology

Stress: From cellular mechanisms to organismal responses and conservation

Cell and Plant Biology

Cell Biology

Cell and Animal Biology

Stress: From cellular mechanisms to organismal responses and conservation

Pumping ions as a response to stress from aquatic habitat transitions: cellular and molecular mechanisms related to evolutionary changes

Date: 4 July 2018

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Ion transport, hydromineral regulation, osmoregulation, ecophysiology, acid-base regulation, salinity changes, plasticity, phenotype, evolutionary transitions

Organisers:

Catherine Lorin-Nebel (Montpellier University, France)
Jonathan Wilson (Wilfrid Laurier University, Canada)
Guy Charmantier (Montpellier University, France)
Greg Goss (University of Alberta, Canada)
Pung-Pung Hwang (Academia Sinica, Taiwan)

Speakers:
  • Yung-Che Tseng (Academia Sinica, Taiwan) - A comprehensive study on acid and ammonium regulations in cephalopods that live in benthic and epipelagic zone
  • Marian Hu (Kiel University, Germany) - New insights from an old model organism: acid-base physiology in the sea urchin larva
  • Carol Eumni Lee (University of Wisconsin, USA) - Rapid Selection on Ion Transporters during Major Habitat Transitions
  • Steffen Madsen (University of Southern Denmark, Denmark) - Aquaporin expression in fish: challenging the paradigm of intestinal water transport

This session will focus on osmoregulation in aquatic animals as a response to stress from habitat transitions or from settlement in stressfull environments such as hypersaline media or fresh water : cellular and molecular mechanisms of hydro-mineral regulation related to ecology and evolution. Migrations of aquatic species between different environments are well known. Invasions of new aquatic habitats with different salinities, e.g. from marine environments to fresh water have been performed by a few animal taxa over evolutionary time and also occur over short periods of time following artificial transport by human activities. Migrating between environments with different salinities or invading them confront the animals with challenges in hydromineral regulation. This session addresses physiological adaptations and acclimation processes that have permitted migrations between or colonizations of habitats with different salinities over different time scales, sometimes resulting in settlement in new habitats. These adaptative strategies will be analyzed at different levels of biological organization from molecules to organisms and populations, in different models, mainly crustaceans and fish.

Related sessions:

The Role of the mitochondria in environmental adaptation and disease

Date: 6 July 2018

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Bioenergetics, oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial adaptations, hypoxia tolerance, thermal acclimation, mitochondrial complex, metabolic suppression, energy metabolism

Organisers:

Angela Fago (Aarhus University, Denmark)
Gina Galli (University of Manchester, UK)
Kim Hellgren (University of Manchester, UK)

Speakers:
  • Steve Hand (Louisiana State University, USA) - Mitochondrial function during energy limited states
  • Raquel Moreno Loshuertos (Universidad De Zaragoza, Spain) - Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA matching shapes metabolism and healthy ageing
  • James Staples (University of Western Ontario, Canada) - Multiple modes of regulating mitochondrial metabolism in a mammalian hibernator 
  • Edward Chouchani (Harvard Medical School, USA) - Mechanisms of mitochondrial redox control over health and disease

The past decade has witnessed an explosion of research into the role of mitochondria in health and disease. In addition to energy production, we now know that mitochondria play an important role in cellular signalling, reactive oxygen species and controlling cell growth. Due to these diverse roles, dysfunctional mitochondria have been implicated in a broad range of human diseases and tissue injuries. On the other hand, recent work from the comparative community has shown that mitochondrial adaptations contribute to environmental tolerance. Understanding mitochondrial function has thus become a major goal for both experimental and clinical biologists. Our session aims to draw together a diverse group of scientists to identify common mitochondrial pathways involved in environmental adaptation, health and disease. The  session will be of interest to scientists from a broad range of disciplines, including medical doctors, molecular biologists as well as comparative physiologists.

Related sessions:



Advances in non-invasive monitoring of stress in the field and laboratory: applications for conservation

Date: 3 July 2018

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following: Endocrinology, neurobiology, animal behaviour, conservation endocrinology and physiology, conservation, cardiovascular biology

Organisers:

Nic Bury (University of Suffolk, UK)
Tessa Smith (University of Chester, UK)
Lynne Sneddon (University of Liverpool, UK)

Speakers:
  • Dorothy McKeegan (University of Glasgow, UK) - Infrared thermography: a non-invasive tool to measure stress in birds
  • Rupert Palme (University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Austria) - In the wild: How to measure stress in free-ranging animals
  • Steven Cooke (Carleton University, Canada) - Conservation relevance is enhanced by taking the lab to the field

The aim of the session is to bring together experts in non-invasive methods of monitoring stress in animals. This includes those using established and novel techniques to measure stress hormone concentrations in animal faeces, hair, saliva, urine, nails and horn, as well as fish scales or mucus, and tank water. But, the apical measurement of stress is not just an endocrine response, and also includes altered behavioural traits as well as perturbed physiological function such as heart rate and blood pressure and immune function. The physiological traits readily measured in the laboratory as a means of gauging an animal’s welfare, are increasingly being used as measures of stress in the wild.  Thus, the session will hopefully bring together wildlife conservationists as well as more traditional lab based scientists to share techniques to monitor stress in an non-invasive way to better inform on animal welfare and the effects of conservation strategies.

Related sessions:

Cell and Plant Biology

General cell and plant biology (poster session only)

Poster session date: 5 July 2018

The general Cell and Plant biology session invites posters on all the aspects of plant and cell biology that are not catered for in the specific section sessions. As such, the session is an important element of the scientific programme, with high-quality presentations on a wide spectrum of subjects.

The general poster session will take place on 5 July 2018 and accepted posters will be grouped into subject areas based on the special interest groups of the Plant and Cell Sections. We particularly encourage submissions from PhD students and early career scientists.


Cell Biology

Systems analyses of multicellularity complexity and organ biology

Dates: 4 and 5 July 2018

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Developmental biology, mathematics, evolutionary theory, computational biology

Organisers:

George Bassel (University of Birmingham, UK)
Leah Band (University of Nottingham, UK)
Mark Fricker (University of Oxford, UK)

Speakers:
  • Ricard Solé (Pompeu Fabra University, Spain) - Synthetic multicellularity: the roads not taken
  • Enrico Coen (John Innes Centre, UK) - Resolving Conflicts: The Genetic Control of Plant Morphogenesis
  • Matthew Gibson (Stowers Institute for Medical Research, USA) - Topology, Geometry and the Fundamental Constraints on Epithelial Order
  • Kirsten Tusscher (Utrecht University, The Netherlands) - Bootstrapping and taming new root meristems
  • Fabian Rost (Technische Universität Dresden, Germany) - Data-driven modelling of cell behaviours
  • Karen Alim (Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Germany) - Integration across an organism by cytoplasmic flows
  • Guillaume Salbreux (The Francis Crick Institute, UK) - Physics of epithelial folding
  • Roeland Merks (Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica, The Netherlands) - Multiscale modeling of mechanobiology: from focal adhesion dynamics to multicellular patterning

This session will bring together researchers from diverse areas of experimental and theoretical biology to focus on the topic of complex organ biology at a cellular level. Understanding how collections of cells come together to form functional organs, and uncovering the higher-order properties of these systems, represents a key challenge in biology. Each the self-assembly and optimized configurations with which cell arrangements are configured within organs will be examined in plant, animal and computational systems. Each the optimization of organ design and potential for future rational engineering will be discussed. This will be achieved through a diverse series of talks from researchers who have been independently working on this common research theme. This session seeks to bring together these researchers to consolidate this emerging area of research.    

Related sessions:

Functional organisation of the nuclear periphery

Dates: 4 - 6 July 2018

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Cell biology, plant biology, signalling, cytoskeleton, chromatin organisation, cell division, epigenetics, nuclear structure, imaging

Organisers:

Katja Graumann (Oxford Brookes University, UK)
David Evans (Oxford Brookes University, UK)
Roland Foisner (Medical University Vienna, Austria)

Speakers:
  • Miriam Charpentier (John Innes Centre, UK) - Plant NE calcium signalling in legume model organism
  • Hank Bass (Florida State University, USA) - Identification and characterisation of maize LINC complex proteins
  • Kentaro Tamura (Kyoto University, Japan) - Movement of nuclei and ncuelus-actin in plants
  • Sue Shackleton (University of Leicester, UK) - LINCing myonuclei to the microtubule cytoskeleton to control nuclear position
  • Ohad Medalia (University of Zürich, Switzerland) - Cryo-EM structure of the lamina
  • Philippe Collas (University of Oslo, Norway) - Lamins in chromatin organisation
  • Dennis Discher (University of Pennsylvania, USA) - Mechanosensing of matrix stiffness by lamin-A,C protects against nuclear rupture and loss of DNA repair factors
  • Yuval Garini (Bar Ilan University, Israel) - Biophysics of chromatin
  • Maria Vartiainen (Helsinki University, Finland) - Nuclear actin in chromatin organization and gene expression
  • Sara Wickström (University of Cologne, Germany) - Stem cell fate and nuclear mechanics

The nuclear envelope is a complex environment with numerous interacting proteins that serve important functions in mechanotransduction and chromatin regulation. Research is progressing rapidly to understand those functions and interactions ranging from the dynamic 3-dimensional organisation of chromatin and its significance for gene expresssion to mechanosignaling and  positioning of nuclei during cell differentiation and development. This session will include presentations on recent advances in knowledge and understanding molecular functions, dynamics and interactions of proteins of the nuclear envelope  across kingdoms; topics will include the proteins of the linker of cytoskeleton and nucleoskeleton complex; the nuclear pore complex; the nucleoskeleton and lamina and the interactions of the nuclear envelope with the cytoskeleton. It will include applications ranging from the role of nuclear envelope proteins in plant stress and disease responses to developmental disorders caused by laminopathies.

Related sessions:

Quantitative synthetic biology

Date: 6 July 2018

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Synthetic biologists, systems biologists, cell biology, mathematics, physics, engineering, computer science

Organisers:

Christian Fleck (Wageningen University, The Netherlands)
Mustafa Khammash (ETH Zürich, Switzrland)
Robert Smith (Wageningen University, Netherlands)

Speakers:
  • Jeff Tabor (Rice University, USA) - Repurposing bacterial two-component systems as sensors for synthetic biology
  • Barbara Di Ventura (University of Freiburg, Germany) - A matter of dynamics
  • Julio Banga (Spanish Council for Scientific Research, Spain) - Dynamics and optimal control of biosystems
  • Guy-Bart Stan (Imperial College London, UK) - Design of de novo biomolecular feedbacks for improved performance and robustness in living cells

The field of synthetic biology aims to accurately and predictively engineer biological systems for our desired purposes. To do this, mathematical analysis is combined with experimental design to optimise biological tools we can exploit. In this session three important areas of synthetic biology will be covered: designing networks for specific purposes, improving their efficiency and robustness, and, ultimately, applying these tools in  fundamental research, biomedical and bioindustrial applications. Attendees will learn in more detail about the range of tools (both theoretical and experimental) available to them that can be used in across numerous biological fields to aid their research and the design of future tools.

Related sessions:

    Sequencing from lab to field and the post genomic era

    Who should submit:

    Researchers with interest in the following areas: DNA sequencing, field-based research, method development, genome research, microbiome analysis

    Date: 5 July 2018

    Organisers:

    Ben Temperton (University of Exeter, UK)
    Richard Tennant (University of Exeter, UK)

    Speakers:
    • Karen Moore (University of Exeter, UK) - Cross platform adaptation of DNA sequencing, for non-traditional samples
    • Joshua Quick (University of Birmingham, UK) - Nanopore sequencing in the field

    For many, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has become routine, with an exponential increase in genomic data accessible throughout the world.  In this post genomic era, the application of DNA sequencing on more diverse sample types, from a variety of sources is becoming more commonplace. Analogous to this diversification, methodologies in DNA extractions, library preparation and sequencing methods are modified and enhanced to meet the challenges presented by changing experimental requirements. These adaptations are allowing DNA sequencing to be performed on a huge variety of samples across medical, agricultural and ecological fields. Novel sequencing technology has also made sequencing portable and real-time, providing a major advance in environmental and medical monitoring, and decoupling acquisition of sequence data from large, centralised sequencing centres. To date, uses of this technology include real-time, field-based monitoring of an Ebola outbreak and analysis of marine microbial communities at sea.

    In this session, we will investigate how novel methods have been employed to extract DNA from difficult sample types and discuss how these methods have been adjusted to work outside a traditional laboratory. The session will also demonstrate the considerations necessary for working in these environments and the concessions that need to be made for success when moving from the lab to the field in the post-genomic era.

    Related sessions:

    Green microbes

    Dates: 3 and 4 July 2018

    Who should submit:

    Researchers with interest in the following areas: algae, bacteria,

    Organisers:

    John Love (University of Exeter, UK)
    John Bothwell (Durham University, UK)

    Speakers:

    Saul Purton (University College London, UK)
    Thomas Brück (Technische Universität München, Germany)