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SEB Brighton 2016 session report: The plant endoplasmic reticulum: A dynamic multitasking organelle
Autumn 2016
31 October 2016

Researchers from Oxford Brookes University and the University of Warwick teamed up to organise a 2-day session on the plant endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The ER is a network-forming organelle present in all cells from plants to humans and plays a vital role in protein production, protein folding, and quality control. As such, the plant ER is responsible for the production and storage of a great proportion of our edible proteins and lipids.

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In conversation with Katherine Denby
Autumn 2016
31 October 2016

“I’ve always liked working as part of a large team,” says Katherine Denby, recently appointed professor at the University of York (UK) and Academic director of the N8 AgriFood programme. Katherine is also a long standing member of the SEB and sits on its Plant Section committee as the plant biotic interactions group convenor.

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Cracking the egg
Autumn 2016
31 October 2016

In July 2016, Brighton played host to an invasion of eggheads. Held on the eve of the annual SEB Conference, the “Cracking the Egg” satellite meeting welcomed egg experts from around the world to gather and share their passion for one of nature’s most delectable phenomena. Organised by egg enthusiasts, Dr Steve Portugal (Royal Holloway, University of London) and Prof Mark Hauber (Cornell University), the aim of the meeting was to “bring together researchers from different scientific fields to talk about all things ‘egg’”. Here are some of the highlights of the day.

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Café Scientifique
Autumn 2016
31 October 2016

Since they first started in 1998, Café Scientifiques have been bringing researchers and the public together to discuss the latest scientific ideas in cafes, bars and restaurants across the country. For the public, these events offer an insight into the real world of academic research. For the researchers meanwhile, it’s an opportunity to have their work scrutinised by a different audience, who often have very searching questions! At our 2016 Annual Meeting, the SEB joined forces with the Brighton Café Scientifique group to present “The good, the bad, and the ugly: Who benefits from living and moving in groups?”