SEB Conference 2021

SCIENCE ACROSS BOUNDARIES –  INTERDISCIPLINARY CELL,PLANT AND ANIMAL BIOLOGY SESSIONS

The following joint Animal, Cell and Plant biology sessions will take place at SEB Annual Conference 2021.

ANIMAL, CELL AND PLANT BIOLOGY

ANIMAL & CELL BIOLOGY 

ANIMAL BIOLOGY AND OED

CELL AND PLANT BIOLOGY



ANIMAL, CELL AND PLANT BIOLOGY

Technology Enabled Approaches to Ecophsyiology 

Organisers:

Oliver Tills
Manuela Truebano
Anne Plessis

Organisers:

Oliver Tills 
Manuela Truebano 
Anne Plessis 

This session is focussed on the application of both established and emerging technology enabled approaches to understanding ecophysiology.

This session is inclusive of global approaches such as molecular-omics and phenomics through to more focussed technology enabled approaches to research targeted on a particular aspect of ecophysiology.

A key unifying principle of the session is in utilising the large datasets produced by technology enabled approaches to understanding key physiological mechanisms and the intention is that this will encompass a broad range of taxa. Research using large datasets present unique challenges relating to big data, analytical approaches and study design.

Our session will draw on the breadth of experience and research interests within the society and bring together researchers using large datasets, from molecular to organismal, across all sections of the society.

Speakers:
Related sessions:

Animal biology sessions
Cell biology sessions
Plant biology sessions

ANIMAL & CELL BIOLOGY 

EPISODIC HYPOXIA: MAMMALIAN SPECIES WITH EXCEPTIONAL TOLERANCE AND HOW TO STUDY THEM 

Organisers:

Frank van Breukelen
Allyson Hindle

Related sessions:

Animal biology sessions
Cell biology sessions

DO ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS ALTER ENERGY BALANCE, HOW CAN WE FIND OUT AND HOW MUCH DOES IT MATTER?

Organiser:

Kimberley Bennett

Do environmental contaminants alter energy balance

The ability to manage energy balance appropriately in a fluctuating environment is fundamental for survival. Increasing evidence suggests anthropogenic contaminants can compromise the ability of orgamisms to regulate their energy balance, with potential negative consequences for population trajectories and biodiversity.  Many anthropogenic chemicals have established roles as toxins, and endocrine disruptors of reproductive and thyroid axes. More recent data implicate many such compounds as lipid disruptors. By altering adipogenesis, fat deposition, lipid profiles, adipose tissue function and hormone sensitivity, environmental contaminants may fundamentally alter energy requirements, storage and use.  Such effects may be subtle or challenging to identify in wildlife and therefore require novel experimental approaches. This session will explore evidence that environmental pollution impacts on energy balance regulation from the molecular to the organismal level across a range of taxa and habitats. It will identify common pathways, highlight challenges and showcase novel experimental approaches to investigate such effects in wildlife that simultaneously experience additional stressors in a fluctuating environment. 

Speakers:
Related sessions:

Neurotransmitters to pheromones: the response of physiological and behavioural signals to environmental change
The physiology behind phenotypic plasticity in rapidly changing environments
Technology Enabled Approaches to Ecophsyiology 

THE PHYSIOLOGY BEHIND PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY IN RAPIDLY CHANGING ENVIRONMENTS 

Organisers:

Tamzin Blewett
Tommy Norin 

 Session picture_TN_TB

Phenotypic plasticity represents the capacity an organism has to change its phenotype (its expression of a given trait or characteristic) in response to a change in its environment, without a change in genotype. Phenotypic plasticity is often thought of as the first “line of defence” against a novel environmental change, allowing the animal to cope with and adapt to the new condition. However, the degree of plasticity varies among individuals and among species, indicating that the mechanisms underlying plasticity vary and/or that plasticity in one or more traits is either costly in of itself or a trade off with plasticity in other key traits. Exploring why and how physiological plasticity varies – and how it relates to plasticity in other traits such as behaviour – is the primary aim of this session.

Embracing the overarching theme of ‘environmental fluctuation’, we encourage submissions from researchers working with species that naturally experience rapid fluctuations in environmental physicochemical parameters (e.g. temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, anthropogenic influences) or physiological state (e.g. binge feeders), such as animals living in intertidal zones, downstream of effluent inputs, or in environments with scarce nutrient resources. These species are among the most fascinating for the experimental biologist, as they must display significant physiological plasticity and/or behavioural adaptations in order to survive, grow, and reproduce. Consequently, the mechanisms by which they achieve homeostasis in light of these challenges can be studied for insight  

Speakers:
  • Prof. Trish Schulte (University of British Columbia, Canada) - Mechanisms of plasticity in tolerance to abiotic stressors in fish
  • Dr. Clare Stawski (Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway) - Physiological and behavioural plasticity of Australian marsupials in a changing environment
  • Prof. Tobias Wang (Aarhus University, Denmark)  - Phenotypic flexibility of digestive and cardiovascular function to intermittent feeding bouts in snakes and other vertebrates
  • Dr. Andrew Turko (McMaster University, Canada) - Feedback among phenotypically plastic behavioural, physiological, and morphological traits in amphibious fish moving between water and land 
Related sessions:

Putting animal biology in ecological context with advances in animal tracking and bio-logging
Do environmental contaminants alter energy balance, how can we find out and how much does it matter?

ANIMAL BIOLOGY AND OED

Open electronics in experimental biology

Organisers:

Michael Oellermann
Richelle Tanner

Open electronics

Arduino, Raspberry PI and many other open source microcontroller and electronical devices have sparked a revolution in electronical development. Initially designed to appeal to electronic hobbyists, such devices have now formed a global community of "Makers" and inventors with accelerating use in industries and professional research. Novel and innovative research requires customised experiments, but it is often hampered by the lack of readily available equipment or sufficient funding. This research need can be addressed with open electronics devices and electronical DIY skills, which provide very flexible low-cost solutions in the lab and field that can be easily maintained and shared among labs, researchers and students. They can further automatise time-consuming tasks in the lab, improve repeatibility of experiments and lead to novel and creative applications.   The session, "Open Electronics in Experimental Biology", aims to bring together researchers and students from different disciplines to exchange innovative self-assembled electronical solutions and to inspire peers to implement DIY applications into their own research.

Speakers:
  • Hannah Wilson (Utah State University, United States) 
  • Jenny Molloy (Shuttleworth Foundation Research Fellow, Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology,  University of Cambridge, UK)
  • Tobias Wenzel (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile)
  • Rui Seabra (CIBIO-InBIO, Universidade do Porto, Portugal)
  • Jolle Jolles (Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior, Germany)
Related sessions:

Animal biology sessions
SEB+ sessions
   

CELL AND PLANT BIOLOGY

Cellular aspects of plant hormone action

Organisers:

Alexander Jones
Sabrina Sabatini

Celullar aspect

Plant hormones serve as signal integrators and master regulators of physiology and development. In multicellular organisms, these functions are crucial for the coordination of the activities of individual cells – each having an independently tuneable hormone level and hormone response – into an ensemble behaviour appropriate for the organism as a whole given the developmental stage and environmental condition. Because plant cells do not move in relation to each other, intercellular movement and patterning of hormones serves a crucial role in plant biology and thus is of long-standing interest.

Speakers:
  • Eva Benkova (Institute of Science and Technology Austria, Autria) - Hormonal regulation of root adaptive responses to environmental signals
  • Bert de Rybel (Ghent University , Belgium) - Vascular transcription factors guide plant epidermal responses to limiting phosphate conditions
  • Laura Ragni (University of Tübingen, Germany) - Specificity in auxin-mediated pericycle growth outputs
  • Niko Geldner (University of Lausanne, Switzerland) - The endodermis - a central hub in root biology
  • Kirsten ten Tusscher (Utrecht University, Netherlands) - The key role of growth and division in root developmental patterning
  • Anna Stepanova (North Carolina State University, United States) - Building a SynBio toolbox to monitor and control plant hormone activity
  • George Coupland (Max Planck Society, Germany) - Regulation of shoot meristem shape during floral induction of Arabidopsis
  • Dolf Weijers (Wageningen University & Research, Netherlands) - Old and swift - A widespread auxin response system built on rapid protein phosphorylation
Related sessions:

Radial signaling and transport in plant roots
Cell biology sessions
Plant biology sessions

General Cell and Plant biology

Cell biology sessions
Plant biology sessions