SEB Seville 2019

ANIMAL BIOLOGY SESSIONS

The following Animal biology sessions will take place at SEB Seville 2019.

ANIMAL, PLANT AND CELL BIOLOGY

ANIMAL AND PLANT BIOLOGY

ANIMAL AND CELL BIOLOGY

ANIMAL BIOLOGY

DEVELOPMENTAL PROGRAMMING AND LIFETIME FITNESS

Energetics: From molecules to organisms

NEUROMECHANICS AND NEUROPHYSICS

RHYTHMS OF LIFE

OTHER ANIMAL SESSIONS

 


ANIMAL, PLANT AND CELL BIOLOGY

Functional micro- and nano-structures in biology


Date: 5 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Zoology, botany, biomechanics, surface science, engineering, biomimetics 

Organisers:
  • Vladimir Katanaev (University of Lausanne, Switzerland)
  • Stanislav Gorb (University of Kiel, Germany)
Speakers:
  • Silvia Vignolini (University of Cambridge, UK)
  • Greg Watson (University of the Sunshine Coast, Australia)
  • Bodo Wilts (University of Fribourg, Switzerland)
  • Di Zhang (Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China)

Various biological surfaces are known to be covered by elaborated micro- and nano-structures, serving a number of functions (e.g. anti-reflective, structural coloration, antifouling, pro- or anti-adhesive, etc.) and inspiring numerous industrial applications. The field of micro- and nano-structured biological surfaces and their applications in biomimetics exists for several decades. Yet recent years have witnessed a remarkable development in research in this field. Largely, this boost owes to the increasing interdisciplinary of approaches being applied to the study of structured bio-surfaces. Sciences as different as classical zoology and botany are inseminated with the advances in genetics and molecular biology; biologists collaborate more and more with nanotechnologists, materials scientists and engineers - all these contribute to the widening of the horizons of research on micro- and nano-structured biological surfaces, and to biomimetic and bioengineering applications of these surfaces in industry. The main goal of our session is to bring together scientists coming from distinct disciplines into this vibrant field of research. This session will ensure cross-inspiration among the different participants coming from different research fields and will boost innovation in research and eventual industrial developments.

Related sessions:

Host-microbiota interactions across animal and plant kingdoms


Dates: 2 & 3 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Microbial ecology, molecular microbiology, genetic, physiology of multicellular organisms and computational biology.

Organisers:
  • Davide Bulgarelli (University of Dundee, UK)
  • Tim Mauchline (Rothamsted Research, UK)
  • Xavier Harrison (Zoological Society London, UK)
Speakers:
  • Julia Vorholt (ETH Zürich, Switzerland)
  • Caroline Gutjahr (Technische Universität München, Germany)
  • Matt Hutchings (UEA, UK)
  • Nicola Segata (University of Trento, Italy)
  • Amanda Bretman (University of Leeds, UK)
  • Maria Elena Martino (University of Padova, Italy)

In the last decade, advances in sequencing and computational approaches have enabled the study of microbial communities associated with eukaryotic organisms at an unprecedented depth. These studies reinforced the notion that microbial communities impact the growth, development and health of their hosts. A prediction of this observation is that translational applications of host-microbiota interactions can impact life on earth for aspects as diverse as sustainable agricultural production and personalised medicine. Given the enormous potential for impact, this research field has been boosted in terms of research efforts globally. Novel methodological approaches and new resources are now available to facilitate next generation discoveries. This session aims at capitalising on these research efforts to highlight emerging trends and foster new, interdisciplinary, research collaborations.

Related sessions:

ANIMAL AND PLANT BIOLOGY

Threatened plants and animals - can understanding physiology inform conservation strategies?

Sponsored by: Conservation physiology

Date: 3 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Ecophysiology, conservation physiology, isotope ecology, physiology, thermobiology, nutritional status, metabolism and biophysical function.

Organisers:
  • Craig Franklin (University of Queensland, Australia)
  • Kevin Hultine (Desert Botanical Garden, USA)
Speakers:
  • Kevin Hultine (Desert Botanical Garden, USA)
  • Sharon Robinson (University of Wollongong, Australia)
  • Christine Madliger (Carleton University, Canada)

The field of conservation physiology has grown exponentially over the last decade as conservation biologists and physiological ecologists are finding novel ways to apply physiological concepts and tools to characterise biodiversity and predict multi-scale responses to environmental change. The proposed session will not only serve as a platform to present the most cutting-edge tools in conservation physiology, but identify convergent themes in plant and animal conservation physiological studies. 


CELL AND ANIMAL BIOLOGY

Sensing the physical environment


Date: 5 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following: Neurobiology, sensory physiology, behaviour biomechanics, cell biology.

Organisers:
  • Cosima Porteus (University of Exeter, UK)
  • Peter Hubbard (Centro de Ciências do Mar, Portugal)
Speakers:
  • John Lewis (University of Ottawa, Canada)
  • Anna Stöckl (Aalto University, Finland)
  • Douglas Altshuler (University of British Columbia, Canada)
  • Danuta Wisniewska (Stanford University, USA)

How do the functional properties of cells allow the detection of physical and chemical properties of their environment? These properties - light, pressure (atmospheric/hydrostatic and acoustic), magnetic field, temperature, pH and inorganic constituents - are used by organisms (bacteria, yeast, plants and animals) in a variety of ways; obtaining nutrients, navigation, homing, migration to name but a few. The aim of this session is to explore, firstly, how organisms detect the physical properties of their immediate environment and, secondly, what use they make of this information. Finally, the possible impact of human activity on these systems will be explored.

Related sessions:

Saving energy in a fluctuating environment: from the whole organism down to the molecule


Date: 3 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Ecophysiology, climate change, energetics, biological rhythm

Organisers:
  • Loic Teulier (Claude Bernard University Lyon, France)
  • Caroline Gilbert (National School of Veterinary Medicine, France)
  • Sylvain Giroud (University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Austria)
Speakers:
  • Annika Herwig (Ulm University, Germany)
  • Fabrice Bertile (University of Strasbourg, France)
  • Jean-Michel Weber (University of Ottawa, Canada)
  • Julia Nowack (Liverpool John Moores University, UK)
  • Matthew Andrews (Oregon State University, USA)

Over the course of evolution, organisms have adapted to environmental variability, notably through an optimisation of the mechanisms regulating energy balance involving morphological, behavioural, physiological, cellular and molecular adaptations. Energy conservation allows organisms to optimize their allocation to fitness components, i.e. survival, reproduction and growth, according to environmental conditions. The session will deal with  how animals are able to conserve energy in response to environmental limitations, such as food or water shortage, cold temperatures, droughts. In particular, we will develop the topic of physiological and behavioral strategies for energy savings from the whole organisms down to the cellular and molecular pathways. During this session, one of the main emphasis will be put on the strategy of hypometabolism as a mean to cope with fluctuating environments. Also, the use of different techniques and methods to assess energy expenditure, at both the whole-body and cellular levels, and body composition will be exposed. The talks will deal with the adaptive responses of animals from a variety of mammal, bird and fish species.


Related sessions:

Brain building: Plasticity in form and function of the central nervous system

Sponsored by: American Association of Anatomists


Date: 4 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following: Neurobiology, neuroplasticity, environmental plasticity, behaviour, tissue remodelling, environmental physiology, stress physiology, endocrinology.


Organisers:
  • Sarah Alderman (University of Guelph, Canada)
  • Matthew Vickaryous (University of Guelph, Canada)
Speakers:
  • Gunther Zupanc (Northeastern University, USA)
  • Lara LaDage (Penn State Altoona, USA)
  • Sacri Ferron (University of Valencia, Spain)
  • Øyvind Øverli (Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway)

Adult neurogenesis – the ability to generate new neurons during postnatal ontogeny – is a taxonomically widespread but poorly understood phenomenon. Comparative models hold enormous promise for understanding the fundamental roles of neurogenesis in vertebrate brain evolution, neuroadaptation in response to environmental stimuli, and even therapeutic treatments for human medicine. This session will explore how and why brain (re)building occurs from multiple perspectives, including molecular and cellular mechanisms through to system and organismal consequences. Topics will include: (i) characterisation and maintenance of neural progenitor cells (ii) organisation and comparative anatomy of proliferation zones, (iii) physiological and environmental regulation of neurogenesis, and (iv) and translational applications.

Related sessions:

Fueling the fire of life – Evolutionary physiology of oxygen supply in vertebrates


Date: 3 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following: Respiratory and cardiac biology, cell and molecular biology, ecophysiology, conservation physiology, comparative endocrinology.

Organisers:
  • Jenni Prokkola (University of Liverpool, UK)
  • Michael Berenbrink (University of Liverpool, UK)
Speakers:
  • Sjannie Lefevre (University of Oslo, Norway)
  • Graham Scott (McMaster University, Canada)
  • Kevin Campbell (University of Manitoba, Canada)
  • Lorna Moore (University of Colorado Denver, USA)

The oxygen supply chain presents a major determinant of performance in vertebrates. The key players in the cascade are well known, and have been shown in some cases to be adapted to oxygen limited environments, including high altitude and hypoxic lakes, in different taxa. With improved genome scanning and transcriptomic techniques in addition to gene editing, adaptations in the system in various conditions can be studied with increasing speed. While adaptation through genetic changes can occur in the key proteins of oxygen supply, plasticity in the system as a whole can lead to limited responses to natural selection, which has not been widely addressed. This session is aimed to foster the sharing of most recent knowledge in both adaptation through natural selection and plasticity at all levels of the oxygen supply chain, for example, in oxygen-binding proteins, endocrine effects on red blood cells, and cardiac and mitochondrial capacity. We invite abstracts for oral and poster presentations covering the topic from the genome to the cellular and organismal levels in any vertebrate species, from terrestrial to aerial and aquatic environments, particularly those taking an evolutionary perspective.        

Related sessions:

Animal Biology

Developmental programming and lifetime fitness

Transgenerational response to environmental stress


Date: 2 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following: Ecophysiology, behaviour, molecular ecology, evolutionary physiology. 

Organisers:
  • Amélie Crespel (University of Glasgow, UK)
  • Shaun Killen (University of Glasgow, UK)
Speakers:
  • Eva Jablonka (Tel Aviv University, Israel) - Stress, epigenetics and the evolution of learning
  • Warren Burggren (University of North Texas, USA) - Epigenetic inheritance as a bridge to surviving temporary environmental stressors
  • Frank Seebacher (University of Sydney, Australia) - Is there a mechanistic link between transgenerational or development plasticity and reversible acclimation?
  • Jennifer Donelson (James Cook University, Australia) - Transgenerational plasticity of coral reef fish to ocean warming

Increasing evidence suggests that environmental stressors can not only impact the population exposed to the stress but also the subsequent generations. This transgenerational response can be crucial in helping species to adapt to new environments, especially when conditions are gradually changing. Even though studies on this subject are increasing, little is still known about how the plastic responses are inherited. This session topic will thus bring to light important insights into the mechanisms underlying phenotypic responses to stress and the ability of populations to respond to environmental change over the course of many generations.

Related sessions:

Developmental programming of adult vertebrate physiology


Date: 3 July 2019

Organisers:
  • Dane Crossley (University of North Texas, USA)
  • Gina Galli (University of Manchester, UK)
Speakers:
  • Dino Giussani (University of Cambridge, UK)
  • Warren Burggren (University of North Texas, USA)
  • Caitlin Wyrwoll (The University of Western Australia, Australia)
  • Dane Crossley (The University of North Texas, USA)

Fluctuations in the developmental environment can profoundly alter organismal structure, function and behaviour. The altered phenotype can persist into adulthood and with possible affects on subsequent generations. This phenomenon, known as developmental programming, has historically been associated with the generation of pathological phenotypes in mammals. However, while mammals normally develop under relatively stable conditions, fluctuations in the developmental environment are a regular part of development for many ectothermic vertebrates. Despite this, far less is known about the long-term impact of developmental programming on ectothermic vertebrate phenotypes. In contrast to mammals, recent evidence suggests environmental stress during development may produce stress-tolerant phenotypes in ectotherms, providing a phenotypic advantage. This session will explore the impact of numerous environmental stressors (e.g. temperature, pH carbon dioxide and oxygen) on the physiology of a broad range of adult vertebrates across numerous levels of biological organisation. The overall aim of the session is to identify common and novel phenotypic signatures associated with developmental programming.

Related session:

Energetics: From molecules to organisms

Heat exchange with the environment: mechanisms and insights into animal energetics

Sponsored by: University of Glasgow - Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health & Comparative Medicine

Date: 4 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following: Comparative physiologists, ecophysiologists, thermal biologists, climate change.

Organisers:
  • Glenn Tattersall (Brock University, Canada)
  • Dominic McCafferty (University of Glasgow, UK)
Speakers:
  • Andrea Fuller (University of Witwatersrand, South Africa)
  • Katherine Herborn (Newcastle University, UK)
  • Andreas Nord (Lund University, Sweden)
  • Paul Jerem (University of Sussex, UK)
  • Agnes Lewden (University of Leeds, UK)
  • Serge Wich (Liverpool John Moores University, UK)
  • Dominic McCafferty (University of Glasgow, UK)
  • Glenn Tattersall (Brock University, Canada)

Body temperature regulation is a fundamental process influencing the physiology, behaviour and ecology of animals. There are major differences between species and considerable temporal and regional differences within the body, that depends on size, phylogeny, and thermoregulatory strategy. Understanding how animals balance heat production, gain, loss, and exchange with the environment is important to understanding their thermal biology.  More recently, advances have been made in non-invasive imaging approaches that enable the tracking of internal physiological events in animals in the wild.  For example, laboratory and field approaches that capture thermal signatures on the surface have been used to study physiological control of peripheral blood flow and evaporative cooling through breathing.  Finally, steady state modelling of heat exchange in the field and the lab has been used to estimate metabolic turn-over in endothermic animals in extreme environments, and recently to test comparatively how control over heat exchange might differ as a result of peripheral form and function. This session aims to provide insights into important determinants of body temperature regulation in animals involving cold and heat adaptation, activity, stress-temperature responses, disease and behavioural thermoregulation. It will highlight the value of integrating non-invasive thermal imaging approaches with internal measures of body temperature to increase our understanding of thermoregulation in animals.

Related session:

How do animals manage their energy expenditure?


Date: 5 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Physiology, environmental physiology, behaviour, biomechanics, ecology.

Organisers:
  • Lewis Halsey (University of Roehampton, UK)
  • Vincent Careau (University of Ottawa, Canada)
Speakers:
  • Kimberley Mathot (University of Alberta, Canada) - (Co-)variation between energy acquisition, storage and use in a migratory shorebird: what can captive studies teach us?
  • Herman Pontzer (Duke University, USA) - Constraints on total daily energy expenditure affect health, ecology, and evolution in humans and other animals
  • Tony Williams (Simon Fraser University, Canada) - Do parents work as hard as they can, are they efficient, or are they lazy?
  • Caroline Williams (University of California Berkeley, USA)

Every biological process of an organism costs energy. Animals are therefore constrained in their actions by the amount of energy they intake and convert – their energy throughput. And their energy throughput is central to their behaviour, physiology and ecology. So how do animals judiciously manage their energy budgets to maximise their lifetime success? In the 1970s and 1980s much progress was made in understanding optimal behaviours, such as optimal foraging. Yet this is approach is entirely movement-based, taking no account of the complex physiological adaptations we now know animals can employ to adjust their metabolic rates. For example, they can move energy expenditure between different biological systems, and adjust the efficiency of those processes to trade-off efficiency with the production of reactive oxygen species. In recent years, some work has begun to look at the 'energy management models' that describe patterns of energy use in animals, and indeed humans. These are proving enlightening, but we are only just starting to understand how and when animals constrain their energy expenditure, whether strategies of energy budgeting differ within and between individuals, how these differences relate to personality traits, and what role food abundance plays. Physiological adaptations to manage energy budgets in the face of food deprivation may prove essential to understanding the relationships between exercise energy expenditure and weight reduction, or otherwise, in 'modern-living' humans.

Related sessions:

NEUROMECHANICS AND NEUROPHYSICS

Sensory and mechanical factors underlying stable and agile control of legged locomotion

Sponsored by: The Royal Society


Date: 5 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Biomechanics, motor control, muscle physiology, sensorimotor systems,  human movement science, bio-inspired robotics.

Organisers:
  • Aleksandra Birn-Jeffery (Queen Mary University London, UK)
  • Monica Daley (Royal Veterinary College, UK)
Speakers:
  • Kiisa Nishikawa (Northern Arizona University, USA) - Biological actuation in human engineered devices
  • James Finley (University of Southern California, USA) - The costs and benefits of asymmetry during healthy and pathological gait
  • Amir Patel (University of Cape Town, South Africa) - Towards an understanding of the cheetah tail using optimal control
  • Charlotte Le Mouel (Computational Neuroscience of Sensory Systems, Institut de la Vision, France) - Learning to adjust body mechanics for efficient and versatile gait initiation

The field of neuromechanics has grown out of the increasing recognition that dynamic locomotor behaviour cannot be understood by separately studying the component parts of animal systems. Agile behaviour emerges from the integration of sensorimotor control, musculoskeletal dynamics and physical interactions with the environment. This session will highlight research into fundamental principles of agile legged locomotion from an integrative perspective. Talks will highlight recent research in neuromechanics of legged locomotion across a range of disciplines, drawing from both theoretical and experimental approaches. We will focus in particular on identifying fundamental physical principles that constrain and shape the most effective control strategies for agile legged locomotion. Animal musculoskeletal and sensorimotor animals are vastly complex. Yet, the whole-body dynamics of legged locomotion can often be described by relatively simple models. These simple models are often considered to capture fundamental physical demands and constraints of legged locomotion. Yet, it remains uncertain what sensorimotor control processes underlie the emergence of apparently simple and robustly stable locomotor dynamics. To encourage discussion of these open issues, this symposium aims to include researchers from a range of fields, including comparative biomechanics, integrative physiology, bio-inspired robotics, human movement science and rehabilitation.

Related sessions:

How brains and bodies interact to generate behaviour: neuronal plasticity and biomechanics


Date: 3 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Biomechanics, neuro-physiology, functional morphology, comparative physiology, biomimetics, mechanical engineering.  


Organisers:
  • Tom Weihmann (University of Cologne, Germany)
  • Gregory Sutton (University of Bristol, UK)
Speakers:
  • Natasha Mhatre (University of Toronto, Canada) - Posture controls the mechanical segregation of signals in the body of the black widow spider
  • Cynthia Harley (Metropolitan State University, USA) - How Hirudo got its groove back: examining the role of physical therapy in recovery following nerve cord injury
  • Tobias Siebert (University of Stuttgart, Germany) - Effects of muscle compression and transversal interactions of activated muscles on the contraction dynamics and power generation of muscles
  • Volker Dürr (Bielefeld University, Germany) - On the role of the body in spatial and temporal coordination of limbs

Movement is a basic manifestation of life and therefore the focus of a wide array of experimental as well as theoretical scientific approaches. Current research reveals that basic control principles are shared by very different species such as mammals, insects and even cartilaginous fish such as porcupine rays. All these animals use specialised limbs to roam their very different habitats which nevertheless yielded similar designs and functional principles of their central pattern generators although their body plans and ancestry differ tremendously from each other. Nervous systems however are highly adaptable enabling a wide range of rhythms and behaviours. In some cases, limbs adopt extremely specialised shapes to cope with the physical requirements of an animal’s ecological niche. These specialised limbs, such as preying or jumping limbs, also require adapted control schemes. In addition to the nervous system and the general design of movement apparatuses, performance and capabilities are also determined by architecture and physiological properties of the driving muscles, a third major player in this framework. The session aims to shed light on these three factors’ (the limb, the nervous system, and the muscles) interplay and the underlying principles which guide animal motions.

Related sessions:

Rhythms of life

Fish chronobiology

In collaboration with: AIEC (Iberian Association for Comparative Endocrinology)


Date: 2 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Chronobiology, physiology, animal biology, pharmacology, reproduction, developmental biology, aquaculture, behavior, feeding, metabolism, stress, epigenetics, animal welfare, environmental factors, sensory systems, endocrine systems, health.   

Organisers:
  • F. Javier Sánchez-Vázquez (University of Murcia, Spain)
  • José A. Muñoz-Cueto (University of Cádiz, Spain)
  • Esther Isorna-Alonso (Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain)
  • Catarina Oliveira (Universidade do Algarve, Portugal)
Speakers:
  • Nick Foulkes (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany)
  • María Jesus Delgado (Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain)

In this session, we aim to introduce recent achievements on research carried out in fish chronobiology. Fish represent a unique model for comparative studies because there is a large number of fish species and they inhabit a wide variety of habitats. Different fish models will be discussed with interest for molecular and physiology studies (zebrafish, goldfish…), aquaculture (sole, sea bass, trout…), and species inhabiting extreme habitats (blind cave fish…). The session will address different aspects related to the ontogeny of biological rhythms and their involvement in reproduction, feeding, behaviour and stress response. The synchronization of biological rhythms to light, temperature and feeding cues and the importance of rhythmicity for fish aquaculture and welfare will be also in the focus of this session.

Related sessions:

Regulation of energy metabolism in fish

In collaboration with: AIEC (Iberian Association for Comparative Endocrinology)


Date: 2 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Fish energetics, hormonal and nutritional regulation, aquaculture, environmental effects.

Organisers:
  • José Luis Soengas (Universidad de Vigo, Spain)
  • Isabel Navarro (Universitat de Barcelona, Spain)
Speakers:
  • Stephane Panserat (INRA-St-Pée Sur Nivellle, France)
  • Luisa Valente (University of Porto, Portugal)

Recent achievements on research carried out on energy metabolism in fish focusing on aspects related to its involvement in endocrine control, food intake, nutrition, growth, environmental effects and impact on aquaculture.

Related sessions:

Clocks for the city: How urban environments shape the rhythms of animals


Date: 4 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Neuroscience, endocrinology, energetics, genomics, behaviour, ecology, evolution and conservation of organisms in urban environments.

Organisers:
  • Sonya Auer (University of Glasgow, UK)
  • Davide Dominoni (University of Glasgow, UK)
  • Nic Bury (University of Suffolk, UK)
Speakers:
  • Sophie Nedelec (University of Exeter, UK) - Commotion in the ocean! Impacts of underwater noise
  • Justine Smith (University of California Berkeley, USA) - Causes and consequences of the increasingly nocturnal lives of exurban carnivores
  • Pierre Deviche (Arizona State University, USA) - Endocrine adjustments of birds to urbanization: stress hormones and reproductive processes
  • Sarah Diamond (Case Western Reserve University, USA) - Cities remodel butterfly seasonal activity: surprises and novel insights from a long-term citizen science monitoring scheme

As the world becomes increasingly urbanised, there is an urgent need to better understand how cities are impacting the lives of plants and animals. There is growing evidence that factors such as altered thermal regimes, increased interactions with humans, and elevated light, noise and chemical pollution are disrupting the circadian and circannual rhythms of city-dwelling organisms. These shifts in the structure and timing of daily and annual events have the potential to alter individual physiological responses, life histories, population dynamics, and community organisation. The overall aim of the session is to integrate research from disparate disciplines to better understand urban impacts on the pace of life in city-dwelling animals. The objectives are to identify and synthesise 1) the relative influence of different urban environmental drivers, 2) impacts across diverse terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, 3) physiological, genetic, and behavioural mechanisms underlying timing responses, and 4) their consequences at the individual, population and community level.

Related sessions:

From genes to behaviour: acclimation mechanisms with potential use as biomarkers in disturbed coastal habitats (cell and animal biology)


Date: 5 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Animal adaptation, animal bioenergetics, cell biology, conservation physiology, ecotoxicology.

Organisers:
  • Georgina Rivera-Ingraham (University of Seville, Spain)
  • Jehan-Hervé Lignot (University of Montpellier, France)
  • Rosa Freitas (University of Aveiro, Portugal)
  • Montserrat Solé (Spanish National Research Council, Spain)
  • Dimitri Theuerkauff (University of Montpellier, France)
Speakers:
  • Karine Salin (IFREMER, France)
  • Dietmar Kültz (University of California Davis, USA)
  • Carolina Freire (Federal University of Paraná, Brazil)
  • Gillian Renshaw (Griffith University, Australia)

This session will focus on the ecophysiology of coastal (interface) organisms and their strategies to cope with (biological or physico-chemical) changes in their environment. These habitats do not only suffer from large changes in salinity, temperature or oxygenation, but often receive high doses of pollutants derived from land use. Furthermore, the introduction of exotic species is causing an additional stress to native species. Traditional ecological monitoring has largely been used to assess ecosystem changes, but often requires large economic and time investments to develop long temporal data series.  Thus, the aim of this session is to bring researchers working on different cellular and sub-cellular strategies (from  gene expression, the activation of antioxidants to pathways of detoxification) leading to increased tolerance to environmental changes in coastal organisms. Being often energy-demanding processes, an important focus will be given to bioenergetics of these adaptations. The final objective will be to debate on which of these markers may allow us to better predict, in each context, the fate of certain species and foresee possible changes in ecosystem composition. Ultimately, we aim to provide a complete perspective on the possibilities that ecophysiological biomarkers may have to contribute to conservation management and policy advise. 

Related sessions:

Other Animal Biology Sessions

Open Biomechanics


Dates: 2 & 4 July 2019

Who should submit:

You can submit any topic related to biomechanics. The presentations cover a broad range of applications and can be inter-disciplinary.

Organiser:
  • Rob James (Coventry University, UK)

The 'open biomechanics session' showcases research in mechanics across a diverse range of topics such as insect and bird flight, fish swimming, mammalian running, suspension feeding, water transport in plants, material properties, kinematics of bird flocks, functional anatomy and muscle mechanics. This session is open to submissions from all topics within biomechanics and is particularly supportive of early career researchers. The session is attended by a large audience from a broad discipline base.  There will also be certificates for the best posters and oral presentations (3 for each category).


Open animal biology


Date: 4 July 2019

Who should submit:

You can submit any topic related to animal biology. The presentations cover a broad range of applications and can be inter-disciplinary.

Organiser:
  • Jack Thomson (University of Liverpool, UK)

The open animal biology session comprises talks and posters on all the aspects of animal biology that are not catered to in the specific Animal Section sessions. As such, the session is an important element of the scientific programme, with high-quality presentations on a wide spectrum of subjects. The programme of talks is organised (as far as possible) into the subject areas of the special interest groups of the Animal Section, so delegates can attend back to back presentations within their general area of interest. We particularly encourage presentations by post grads, postdocs and early career scientists.