SEB Sevile 2019

PLANT BIOLOGY SESSIONS

The following Plant biology sessions will take place at SEB Seville 2019.

PLANT, ANIMAL AND CELL BIOLOGY

PLANT AND ANIMAL BIOLOGY

PLANT AND CELL BIOLOGY

PLANT BIOLOGY


PLANT, ANIMAL AND CELL BIOLOGY

Functional micro- and nano-structures in biology


Date: 5 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Zoology, botany, biomechanics, surface science, engineering, biomimetics 

Organisers:
  • Vladimir Katanaev (University of Lausanne, Switzerland)
  • Stanislav Gorb (University of Kiel, Germany)
Speakers:
  • Silvia Vignolini (University of Cambridge, UK) - Colour Engineering: form nature to applications
  • Uwe Erb (University of Toronto, Canada) - Superhydrophobic Surfaces: From Aspen Leaves to Advanced Industrial Coatings
  • Bodo Wilts (University of Fribourg, Switzerland) - Rainbows in nature: photonic structures, pigments and the role of disorder
  • Di Zhang (Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China)

Various biological surfaces are known to be covered by elaborated micro- and nano-structures, serving a number of functions (e.g. anti-reflective, structural coloration, antifouling, pro- or anti-adhesive, etc.) and inspiring numerous industrial applications. The field of micro- and nano-structured biological surfaces and their applications in biomimetics exists for several decades. Yet recent years have witnessed a remarkable development in research in this field. Largely, this boost owes to the increasing interdisciplinary of approaches being applied to the study of structured bio-surfaces. Sciences as different as classical zoology and botany are inseminated with the advances in genetics and molecular biology; biologists collaborate more and more with nanotechnologists, materials scientists and engineers - all these contribute to the widening of the horizons of research on micro- and nano-structured biological surfaces, and to biomimetic and bioengineering applications of these surfaces in industry. The main goal of our session is to bring together scientists coming from distinct disciplines into this vibrant field of research. This session will ensure cross-inspiration among the different participants coming from different research fields and will boost innovation in research and eventual industrial developments.

Related sessions:

Host-microbiota interactions across animal and plant kingdoms


Date: 2 & 3 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Microbial ecology, molecular microbiology, genetic, physiology of multicellular organisms and computational biology.

Organisers:
  • Davide Bulgarelli (University of Dundee, UK)
  • Tim Mauchline (Rothamsted Research, UK)
  • Xavier Harrison (Zoological Society London, UK)
Speakers:
  • Julia Vorholt (ETH Zürich, Switzerland) - The leaf microbiota: disassembling and rebuilding to explore plant microbe interactions
  • Caroline Gutjahr (Technische Universität München, Germany) - Interaction of plants with arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi
  • Matt Hutchings (UEA, UK)
  • Nicola Segata (University of Trento, Italy)
  • Amanda Bretman (University of Leeds, UK) - Sex and age-specific impacts of social context on microbiomes of Drosophila melanogasterfruit flies
  • Maria Elena Martino (University of Padova, Italy)

In the last decade, advances in sequencing and computational approaches have enabled the study of microbial communities associated with eukaryotic organisms at an unprecedented depth. These studies reinforced the notion that microbial communities impact the growth, development and health of their hosts. A prediction of this observation is that translational applications of host-microbiota interactions can impact life on earth for aspects as diverse as sustainable agricultural production and personalised medicine. Given the enormous potential for impact, this research field has been boosted in terms of research efforts globally. Novel methodological approaches and new resources are now available to facilitate next generation discoveries. This session aims at capitalising on these research efforts to highlight emerging trends and foster new, interdisciplinary, research collaborations.

Related sessions:

PLANT AND ANIMAL BIOLOGY

Threatened plants and animals - Can understanding physiology inform conservation strategies?

Sponsored by: Conservation physiology

Date: 3 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Ecophysiology, conservation physiology, isotope ecology, physiology, thermobiology, nutritional status, metabolism and biophysical function.

Organisers:
  • Craig Franklin (University of Queensland, Australia)
  • Kevin Hultine (Desert Botanical Garden, USA)
Speakers:
  • Kevin Hultine (Desert Botanical Garden, USA) - The genetics of survival: will local adaptation save or peril the foundation tree species, Populus fremontii from the effects of global environmental change?
  • Sharon Robinson (University of Wollongong, Australia) - How understanding plant physiology can inform conservation strategies for Antarctic ecosystems
  • Christine Madliger (Carleton University, Canada) - Conservation Physiology's contribution to conservation management: evidence, perceptions, and future opportunities
  • Craig Franklin (University of Queensland, Australia) - Mitigating anthropogenic barriers to fish passage and understanding the physiology of threatened fish species to inform management guidelines
  • Jesús M. Castillo (Universidad de Sevilla, Spain) - Confronting sea level rise: combined effects of salinity and inundation on C4 metabolism of cordgrasses and their hybrids

The field of conservation physiology has grown exponentially over the last decade as conservation biologists and physiological ecologists are finding novel ways to apply physiological concepts and tools to characterise biodiversity and predict multi-scale responses to environmental change. The proposed session will not only serve as a platform to present the most cutting-edge tools in conservation physiology, but identify convergent themes in plant and animal conservation physiological studies. 


PLANT AND CELL BIOLOGY

Tip growth in plant biology


Date: 4 & 5 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following areas: Life science, engineering, computer science and mathematical backgrounds with interest in the development of root hairs, pollen tubes, moss protonemata and fungal hyphae.

Organisers:
  • Kris Vissenberg (University of Antwerp, Belgium)
  • José Feijó (University of Maryland, USA)
Speakers:
  • Liam Dolan (University of Oxford, UK) - Emergence and evolution of tip growth in land plants
  • Zhenbiao Yang (University of California Riverside, USA) - Mechanisms overarching apical, guided and invasive growth
  • Stefan Kepinski (University of Leeds, UK)
  • José Feijo (University of Maryland, UK) - Ion homeostasis and the control of apical growth: molecular basis and integrative mechanisms
  • Aurelien Boisson-Dernier (University of Cologne, Germany) - Cell wall integrity sensing mechanisms in tip-growing cells
  • Magdalena Bezanilla (Dartmouth College, USA) - Steering tip growth: a cytoskeletal perspective
  • Armin Haupt (Institut Jacques Monod, France) - Growth promotes polarity through a positive feedback

Tip growth is a process that diverse walled cells such as pollen tubes, root hairs, moss protonemata and fungal hyphae have in common. Due to the diversity of the experimental systems, it is unusual for those working on the phenomenon to have the opportunity to get together and compare systems and concepts. The aim of this session is to provide an overview on recent advances in the molecular, physiological and genetic mechanisms underlying tip growth, but other aspects of cell polarity establishment and maintenance as well as trafficking, cytoskeleton remodelling, signaling and biophysics will be covered, in an attempt to promote and facilitate interactions between experimental researchers and modelers from life science, engineering, computer science and mathematical backgrounds.

Related sessions:

Plant epigenetics


Date: 2 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following: Epigenetics, molecular biology, DNA stability, genetics, evolution, adaptation, plant responses to environmental changes (biotic and abiotic stresses), plant physiology, plant development   

Organiser:
  • Ana López Sánchez (CSIC, Spain)
Speakers:
  • Germán Martínez (Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden) - Epigenetic reprogramming during plant sexual reproduction
  • David Baulcombe (University of Cambridge, UK) - Adaptation to environmental stress by a chromatin-based stress memory
  • Hailing Jin (University of California Riverside, USA) - Cross-Kingdom RNAi and small RNA trafficking between plant and fungal pathogens
  • Daniel Zilberman (John Innes Centre, UK) - Stable epigenetic inheritance of DNA methylation through pathway integration
  • Teresa Roldan (University of Cordoba, Spain) - Base excision repair: from genome repair to epigenome regulation

Epigenetics is a novel concept conceived as the study of inheritable phenotypic differences in the absence of changes to the DNA sequence. The discovery of epigenetics caused a paradigm shift in genetics, having important consequences for a broad spectrum of disciplines, from cancer research to psychology. Epigenetic mechanisms were first discovered in plants, and since then, they have been demonstrated to play an important role in a widespread variety of biological processes, including: plant response to environmental changes, cell fate determination, chromosome organization, DNA recombination and repair, silencing of transposable elements (TEs) to control genome stability, and evolution. Additionally, epigenetics has emerged as a powerful biotechnological tool for agricultural interests, as it facilitates the stable manipulation of gene expression avoiding transgenesis. Moreover, the use of our current knowledge in epigenetics allows us to detect and induce new variants, having the potential to yield innovative and perhaps more sustainable agricultural strategies. With this in mind, our goal is to bring together world leaders, early career researchers and students in the field of epigenetics. This session aims to promote their interaction in the most conducive and encouraging environment, addressing many different aspects of epigenetics, from mechanisms to biological roles.   

Related sessions:

General cell and plant biology (poster session only)

The general Cell and Plant biology session invites posters on all the aspects of plant and cell biology that are not catered for in the specific section sessions. As such, the session is an important element of the scientific programme, with high-quality presentations on a wide spectrum of subjects. 


PLANT BIOLOGY

Redox regulation in chloroplasts


Date: 2 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following: Photosynthesis, abiotic stresses, developmental processes, chloroplast metabolism, antioxidant compounds.   

Organisers:
  • Angel Merida (CSIS, Spain)
  • Mariam Sahrawy (CSIS, Spain)
  • Antonio Serrato (CSIS, Spain)
Speakers:
  • Mónica Balsera (Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiología de Salamanca, Spain)
  • Stéphane Lemaire (CNRS, Sorbonne Université, France)

The session will be focused towards the different processes that take place in the chloroplast and are subjected to redox regulation, such as the photosynthetic electron flux, carbon fixation, carbohydrate formation, developmental processes or adaptation to different abiotic or biotic stresses. Changes in light intensity can occur very rapidly in nature, affecting massively photosynthesis of plants by altering quickly the amount of light energy available for electron transport and carbon fixation. Several of the processes of adaptation to these changes are modulated by redox regulation mediated by different proteins such as thioredoxins, glutaredoxins and peroxiredoxins. A rapid and fine tuning of these processes are essential for the viability of the plant. In addition, the redox regulation is not limited to photosynthetic reactions and can also regulates developmental process or abiotic stress tolerance. Despite some results have been reported on these aspects, the contribution of the different elements to the redox regulation network has not been well defined yet. This session aims to bring together specialists on the different aspects of redox regulation in chloroplasts and to show an up-dated vision of the topic.

Related sessions:

An extended plant phenotype: characterising plant-soil microbiome interactions


Sponsored by:
IRD , The Plant Journal
Date: 4 & 5 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following: Plant, soil, microbial, agriculture and climate change sciences, systems, modelling, genomics and phenomics

Organisers:
  • Gabriel Castrillo (University of Nottingham, UK)
  • Malcolm Bennett (University of Nottingham, UK)
  • Laurent Laplaze (IRD, Senegal)
Speakers:
  • Marc Buée (INRA Nancy, France) - Forest meta-omics: Integrated metatranscriptomic and metagenomic analyses of fungal assemblages in root and soil compartments
  • Natalie Breakfield (NewLeaf Symbiotics, USA) - M-trophs for sustainable agriculture
  • Ruben Garrido-Oter (Max Planck Institute For Plant Breeding Research, Germany) - Computational design of synthetic plant-associated microbial consortia
  • Stéphane Hacquard (Max Planck Institute For Plant Breeding Research, Germany) - Dissecting the role of multi-kingdom microbial consortia on plant health
  • Isai Salas Gonzalez (University of North Carolina, USA) - Utilizing synthetic ecology and phylogenomics to unravel cues of A. thaliana root microbiome assembly
  • Tim Mauchline (Rothamsted Research, UK) - Rooting around the wheat microbiome
  • Laurent Laplaze (IRD, Senegal) - Rhizosheath formation in pearl millet: physiological bases and genetic control 

This session presents an overview of the most recent findings in the plant microbiome field. The aims of the session are to update the scientific community on new microbiome discoveries from the lab to the field and from the soil microbiota to the plant microbiome assembly; gain an appreciation of the potential for using microbiome based strategies in the modern agriculture; highlight the most recent tools and techniques in the study of complex biological systems; promote discussions about the implementation of new strategies in the agricultural microbiome research. The session's programme will consist of a combination of diverse microbiome experts from academic and private companies. It provides an excellent opportunity for defining new priorities in the microbiome science. The session has been designed to cover the progress from basic investigation in the lab to how we can apply it to the agriculture development; very attractive for private companies and academics. This session will provide a very attractive scientific context for discussion and interacting with other plant science disciplines.

Related session:

Impact and functions of alternative splicing in plants

Date: 2 & 3 July 2019
Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following: Molecular biology, regulation of gene expression, RNA biology, Pre-mRNA splicing, alternative splicing, transcriptomics, ribonomics, bioinformatics, plant development, plant stress responses.

Organisers:
  • Maria Kalyna (University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Austria)
  • Paula Duque (Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência, Portugal)
  • John Brown (University of Dundee, UK)
Speakers:
  • Andrea Barta (Medical University Vienna, Austria) - Advances in alternative splicing studies in plants - an overview
  • Martin Crespi (Institute of Plant Sciences Paris-Saclay, France) - A long non-coding RNA modulates alternative splicing in Arabidopsis
  • Paula Duque (Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência, Portugal) - Alternative splicing control of abiotic stress responses
  • Misato Ohtani (NAIST-BS, Japan) - Roles for snRNP biogenesis in plant development and environmental response
  • Dorothee Staiger (Bielefeld University, Germany) - Ribonomics to unravel posttranscriptional networks in Arabidopsis
  • Anireddy Reddy (Colorado State University, USA) - Genome-scale analyses of alternative splicing and its regulation using high-throughput next generation sequencing technologies
  • Karel Riha (CEITEC Masaryk University, Czech Republic) - Exploring functions of nonsense-mediated RNA decay factors in plants: RNA quality control and beyond

Alternative splicing is a key post transcriptional mechanism that generates transcript and protein variants with different fates and functions from a single gene. Though a fundamental aspect of RNA biology and a major strategy to increase the coding and regulatory potential of eukaryotic genomes, it remains one of the least studied levels of gene expression control. Up to 70% of plant intron-containing genes are currently estimated to undergo alternative splicing, which determines many plant development and environmental response processes.

This session will cover the latest research on the mechanisms and relevance of alternative splicing in plant systems, focusing on the most recent approaches — e.g. transcriptomics, ribonomics, state-of the-art bioinformatics tools — and integrating different fields, such as molecular biology, genetics, cell biology, physiology, pathology and biotechnology, that are crucial to understand gene expression regulation in plants.

Related sessions:

Stomatal and photosynthetic regulation of water use efficiency

Sponsored by: The Plant Cell, Plant DirectLI-COR Biosciences, ADC BioScientific Ltd.

Date: 4 July 2019
Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following: Cell biology, molecular genetics and physiology, quantitative genetics, crop phenotyping, physiology of stomata, photosynthesis, water use efficiency.

Poster prize: 

ADC BioScientific Ltd. will be awarding a poster prize in this session with the winner receiving £250.

Organisers:
  • Andrew Leakey (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA)
  • Tracy Lawson (University of Essex, UK)
Speakers:
  • Michael Blatt (University of Glasgow, UK) - Predictive modelling of stomata across scales from molecule to the field
  • Asaph Cousins (Washington State University, USA) - Leaf structural, anatomical and biochemical determinants of mesophyll co2 conductance in c4 grasses
  • John Ferguson (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA - Predictive modelling of stomata across scales from molecule to the field

  • Tracy Lawson (University of Essex, UK) - Stomatal blue light response and the impact on assimilation and water use efficiency

  • Julie Gray (University of Sheffield, UK) - Water Use Efficiency Across Scales
  • Belinda Medlyn (University of Western Sydney, Australia)
  • Michael Raissig (Heidelberg University, Germany) - Developmental innovations of stomatal form and function in grasses
  • Francois Tardieu (INRA, France)

This session will explore the mechanisms underlying genetic and environmental control of water use efficiency in crops and model plant species. The approach will be highly integrative, bringing together researchers studying water use efficiency at all scales from the cell to the crop canopy.  In addition to having a strong focus on fundamental discoveries about the regulation of stomatal and photosynthetic form and function, the session will reflect the importance of water use efficiency as a trait that needs to be improved in crops to enhance productivity, climate resilience and agricultural sustainability.

Related sessions:

Mechanisms and mitigation of plant water deficit: from the bottom up

Sponsored by: DILUS

Date: 3 July 2019
Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following: Crops, plant physiology, plant water relations, crop photosynthesis, crop growth modelling.

Organisers:
  • Ian Dodd (University of Lancaster, UK)
  • Antonio Diaz-Espejo (CSIC, Spain)
Speakers:
  • Francesca Cardinale (University of Turin, Italy) - Organ-specific dynamics and roles of strigolactones under drought
  • Xavier Draye (Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium)
  • Thomas Buckley (University of California, Davis, USA) - How do stomata respond to water status?
  • Jaume Flexas (University of Balearic Islands,Spain) - Linking anatomy-mediated photosynthesis capacity with water: leaf hydraulics, desiccation tolerance and the bulk modulus of elasticity

This session aims to cover recent advances in our understanding of how plants respond to water deficit, by enticing those from the root phenotyping, xylem hydraulics, long-distance chemical signalling and photosynthesis communities. It aims to integrate these sub-disciplines by exploring interactions between different parts of the plant and their regulation. Progress in these areas is expected to assist plant breeders and agronomists to enhance crop yields under water-limited conditions, but requires that attention is given to the appropriate traits.


Heat and drought tolerance – from the lab to impact in the field

Date: 5 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following: Plant molecular biology, plant physiology, crop biology, field scientists, crop engineering, biostatistics. 

Organisers:
  • Matthew Gilliham (University of Adelaide, Australia)
  • Zoe Wilson (Nottingham University, UK)
  • Malcolm Hawkesford (Rothamsted Research, UK)
  • Owen Atkin (Australian National University, Australia)
Speakers:
  • Rainer Hedrich (University of Wurzburg, Germany) - SLAC1 anion channel of grasses allows for the control of stomatal aperture by nitrate
  • Jose Colmenero-Flores (Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiología (CSIC), Spain) - The role of chloride homeostasis on plant drought resistance
  • Elizabete Carmo-Silva (Lancaster University, UK)
  • Malcolm Hawkesford (Rothamsted Research, UK) - Phenotyping wheat trials for canopy temperature using drones and thermal imagery
  • Zoe Wilson (University of Nottingham, UK)
  • Owen Atkin (Australian National University, Australia) - Global variability in photosynthetic heat tolerance quantified using chlorophyll-a fluorescence

This session will focus on the molecular and physiological mechanisms of model and crop plant abiotic stress perception and tolerance, the development and implementation of technologies underpinning precise phenotyping and monitoring of environmental conditions, and on the agronomic practices that improve plant stress tolerance. The session will showcase multiple approaches that lead to tackling crop stress tolerance encompassing disciplines beyond plant sciences, and will be a forum for open and informed discussion about approaches that lead to this aim - from breakthrough discoveries, experimental design, traits that have relevance in the field, and management options. Therefore this session will span blue-sky fundamental research to targeted solutions in the field.


Gene networks for crop improvement


Date: 3 & 4 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following: Crop improvement, systems biology, gene networks, genomics, non-model species. 

Organisers:
  • Philippa Borrill (University of Birmingham, UK)
  • Andrea Bräutigam (University of Bielefeld, Germany)
Speakers:
  • Colleen Doherty (North Carolina State University, USA) - Examining the plasticity of gene regulatory networks to improve crop tolerance to temperature stress
  • Bob Schmitz (University of Georgia, USA) - Systematic discovery of gene regulatory elements using chromatin structure in plant genomes
  • Philippa Borrill (University of Birmingham, UK) - Gene networks in polyploid wheat
  • Zoran Nikoloski (Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Germany) - Context-specific gene-regulatory networks in maize

In recent years, complete high quality reference sequences have been released for many crop species which provide an opportunity to apply systems biology approaches to understand gene networks regulating agronomically relevant traits. This session will discuss the use of gene network modelling to enable the to prediction gene networks and key breeding targets across a range of crop species. The session will also consider how the rapid identification of breeding targets, along with techniques such as gene editing could accelerate plant breeding. 

Related sessions:

In silico plants


Date: 5 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following: Biochemistry, biomechanics, bioengineering, computational biology, climate change adaptation, crop breeding, development, gene expression, mathematical modelling of biological systems, omics, plant genetics, plant secondary metabolism, systems biology, synthetic biology.

Organisers:
  • Steve Long (University of Illinois, USA and University of Lancaster, UK)
  • Lee Sweetlove (Oxford University, UK)
Speakers:
  • Graeme Hammer (University of Queensland, Australia) - Designing sorghum crops for adaptation to future climates
  • Steve Long (University of Illinois, USA/University of Lancaster, UK) - How in silico engineering of photosynthesis has resulted in proven sustainable increases in productivity of crops in the field
  • Amy Marshall-Colon (University of Illinois, USA) - Modelling dependence in N-signalling cascades using dynamic transcriptome data
  • Jonathan Lynch (Pennsylvania State University, USA/Nottingham University, UK) - Roots for 10 Billion: Modelling phenes and phenotypes for improved soil resource capture
  • Przemyslaw Prusinkiewicz (University of Calgary, Canada) - Development and structure of flowers: data, hypotheses, and models
  • Lee Sweetlove (Oxford University, UK) - Functional insights from analysis of large-scale metabolic network models.
  • Xinguang Zhu (Chinese Academy of Sciences, China) - Designing rice ideotypes for different environments with WACNI – a model of Whole plAnt C-N Interaction

Ever-increasing computational power, is allowing rapid advances in mathematical modelling of biological systems; for example the creation of the virtual rat. These are approaches that are revolutionising the  life sciences. For plant biology this promises acceleration of understanding of the fundamentals of cell and organ development through to providing an informed molecular and biochemical framework for predicting systems and synthetic engineering of sustainable increases in crop yield under climate change. This session will focus on advances and achievements in computational plant biology, with particular emphasis on scaling and integrating through different levels of organization from whole plant and organ down to gene expression networks. It will include new tools for integrating models of different processes and layers of organisation to progress in the 3D representation from cells to crops. It will include, examples where in silico engineering is guiding breeding and bioengineering and has resulted in successful test-of-concepts in crop field trials from photosynthesis to 3D root-soil interactions. Offered presentations on all aspects of mathematical and computational plant biology will be welcome as well applications in the classroom.  

Related sessions:

Time, temperature and a transforming world


Date: 2 & 3 July 2019

Who should submit:

Researchers with interest in the following: Temperature sensing, phenological response, plant responses to climate change (both physiological and molecular), circadian signaling and regulation, thermobiology, gating of temperature responses, plant adaptation to stress, gene regulatory networks, cross-talk in plant signaling.

Organiser:
  • Colleen Doherty (North Carolina State University, USA) 
Speakers:
  • Dawn Nagel (University of California Riverside, USA) - Transcriptional integration of temperature and the clock
  • Jose Pruneda-Paz (University of California, San Diego, USA) - Unravelling the molecular mechanisms underlying plant clock function
  • Olivia Wilkins (McGill University, Canada) - The role of time and temperature on gene regulatory networks
  • Akiko Satake (Kyushu University, Japan) - Unravelling flowering phenology shift under climate warming by field transcriptome
  • Connie Harrington (US Department of Agriculture Forest Service, USA) - When do trees grow? Environmental signals which start and stop growth in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii)
  • Krishna Jagadish (Kansas State University, USA) - Night-time temperature and flower opening time dynamics affect crop adaptation in a changing climate
  • Isabelle Chuine (CEFE CNRS, France) - Why we do need more experimental phenology?

Changing weather patterns are detrimental to plant growth and performance. Earlier springs, warmer nights, and other changes in temperature patterns have a negative impact on yield. Altered timing of weather events disrupts the coordination between internal activities and the surrounding environment. The plant’s circadian clock controls the coordination between molecular activities and the environment enabling optimised performance for a specific locale. This session focuses on the intersection of time and temperature signalling pathways and presents recent findings on how temperature affects the circadian clock and the role of time and the clock in the regulation of plant responses to temperature change and effects on phenology. We aim to bring together researchers whose focus spans from biochemistry to physiology to ecology. This session will explore recent discoveries in the biochemical signalling pathways that enable plants to sense changes in temperature and how these feed into the circadian clock; the physiological effects of changes in weather patterns and implications for a changing climate; the effects of changing temperature patterns on phenology and the ecological consequences of such changes. We strive to stimulate discussion on how to work across these system levels to develop plants that are resilient to a changing planet.   

Related sessions: